Sunday, December 4News For London

LifeStyle

The Crown season 5 causing a stir in town

The Crown season 5 causing a stir in town

Culture, Film, LifeStyle, Royal Family
The upcoming season 'inspired by true events' grabs attention ahead of its release Picture Credit: Netflix The big-budget Royal drama series The Crown season 5 set to release on November 9 is facing more heat than any other season in the past. After the Queen’s demise, it is a very sensitive time to release the season which contains the ‘most controversies’ that Royal family has been linked to. For the first time in the show’s history, Netflix had to add a disclaimer to its marketing after it attracted backlash on its storyline. The disclaimer states the upcoming season of The Crown is ‘fictional’ and ‘inspired by true events’. Many historians and eminent personalities have criticised the series in the past and the latest critic is Former Prime Minister Sir John Major calling
The issues surrounding black hairstyles explained

The issues surrounding black hairstyles explained

Education, Experience, Explainer, Explainers, LifeStyle, London, Media, Racism, Women
https://youtu.be/VvAYRqXcql4 With 2020 being a huge year for the progression of the Black Lives Matter movement, we take a look at the lack of understanding and misrepresentation of black hair and why this continues to be a topic of debate. In this video we cover the worldwide policing of black hair that often leads to people feeling discriminated, racially targeted and harassed. In a time led by diversity, inclusion and human rights campaigns are ever present, but why are there still conversations that decide how black people should wear their hair? How is racism linked to this problem and why do some black people feel the need to find ways in order to make sure they fit into society and are perceived as presentable enough.

Why younger people work harder than their parents for less?

economy, Education, Explainer, Explainers, Explainers, Health, International, LifeStyle, youth
https://youtu.be/lfsVrtg7SSQ Video / Jinglin Zhou Millennials and Generation Z, are always faced with high requirements and have to work harder to succeed. A research carried out at OfficeGenie found that millennials worked on average a whopping seven hours and 22 minutes extra each week. Another study from the Workforce Institute at Kronos Incorporated showed 32% of Gen Z respondents say they are the hardest-working generation ever, and 36% believe they "had it the hardest" when entering the working world compared with all other ages before it. But they haven't gain more from hard working. In the UK, salaries for millennials and Gen Z are 20% down on what their parents earned during the same period of their lives. Working harder is not the way that leads to success. I...
Father Christmas, more like Mother Christmas: Is it womens’ job to create the magic of the holidays?

Father Christmas, more like Mother Christmas: Is it womens’ job to create the magic of the holidays?

Christmas, Covid-19, Culture, Food, LifeStyle, Women
Photo credit: Catalin Bot The burden of upholding Christmas traditions falls to women, even in 2020. At least, this is according to a SAGE report. The document outlines the insights into celebrating holidays including Halloween, Bonfire Night, and Christmas during covid-19.  Speaking about women at Christmas, the report said: “Women carry the burden of creating and maintaining family traditions and activities at Christmas.” It further stated: “Messaging should be supportive of women adapting traditions.”  There is the implication that adapting Christmas to a covid-19 world will also be the responsibility of women this year.  Are women really the driving force behind Christmas? Westminster World spoke to members of the public to see how roles are divided or shared
Shoppers hit Oxford Street as lockdown lifts

Shoppers hit Oxford Street as lockdown lifts

Black Friday, Business, clothes, Covid-19, economy, Fashion, LifeStyle, London, shopping, shopping
Busy store front in Oxford Circus| Photo Credit: Anjali Coronavirus restrictions have had an enormous impact on our daily lives; from jobs to consumer habits and social distancing, businesses and individuals are continuously adapting to survive the lockdown/tier system cycle.  The clothing retail market has experienced economic impact across the scale – from businesses increasingly relying on online sales, to some going into administration. The hospitality sector has suffered too, and currently operates under restrictions to support social distancing.  Tier 2, the category London is in, does not include restrictions on clothing retailers re-opening since the latest lockdown was lifted last week. Shops like Primark kept some of their branches open through Thursday night.
The issue with holiday deals: fast fashion is not sustainable

The issue with holiday deals: fast fashion is not sustainable

Black Friday, Covid-19, Environment, Fashion, LifeStyle, shopping
Shoppers walk around central London. Credit: Lubna bin Zayyad Black Friday and its follow up - Cyber Monday saw retailers markdown products in a bid to get consumers to purchase items leading up to the holiday season. Online retailer Pretty Little Thing caused a commotion over the weekend after introducing their ninety-nine percent off sale. Consumers everywhere expressed their disappointment over missing out on such a huge sale - where clothes were going for as little as fifteen pence. However, many expressed concern over just how sustainable and ethical the major sale was considering the brand is one of many fast fashion retailers on the market. https://youtu.be/Fp1SkkGT5pg Fast Fashion is cheap- but at what cost? In a bid to both create and keep up with demand, bu...
Randy Brits stock up on sex toys during lockdown.

Randy Brits stock up on sex toys during lockdown.

Adults, Breaking News, Covid-19, dating, Health, LifeStyle, London, shopping, Video, Women
People turned to sex toys as restrictions keep couples apart. Photo: Anna Shvets Coronavirus restrictions have sent sales of sex toys soaring, as Brits stock up during lockdown. With nowhere to go, and not much to do, Brits have turned to sex toys to satisfy their sexual urges. In the first two weeks of the March lockdown, sex toys sales increased by 25 per cent, according to the Daily Mirror. The trend has again been repeated during the current lockdown; Zuleika Philips, owner of Pleasure Drum, an online wellness and sex toy shop aimed at women of African heritage, told Westminster World: “Over the Covid period we have definitely seen an increase of about 30% pickup of toys.”  In addition, Ms Philips mentioned that they’ve also received a lot more interest from men. C
Coronavirus: how the pandemic reinforce the gender gap

Coronavirus: how the pandemic reinforce the gender gap

Breaking News, Covid-19, Data Journalism, Education, Explainers, Gender, LifeStyle, London, Women, Worldnews
During the pandemic, who is responsible for domestic work in your country? Photo by Haiyue According to the new report from UN Women, women are spending more time to do domestic chores compared with the normal time. Amid COVID-19, household chores have new purpose and value and are being increasingly recognized as a form of essential work. Chores like cooking, shopping for groceries and cleaning, particularly to prevent infection, are all taking longer than ever. Photo from UN Woman However, more and more people have to work from home due to Covid-19 in different countries, while the truth is that women still shoulder the major housework. Available data from thirty-eight countries overwhelmingly confirm that on sixty per cent of women and fifty-four per cent of...
How running can help you beat anxiety during lockdown 2.0

How running can help you beat anxiety during lockdown 2.0

Covid-19, Fitness, Health, LifeStyle, London, NHS, Sport, Sports
Photo: Rahul Bamane Looking after mental health and well-being seems more challenging than ever, as the country transit lockdown 2.0 and what seems to be an uncertain winter. Athletes and new scientific research advocate for performing outdoor exercises to ease anxiety and depression. Clive Castillo, Basketball Team Coach of the University of Westminster Dragons Team, referred to sports as a major escape during lockdown. “Mental health is directly proportional to physical health and being outdoors can help one get better. It imbibes positivity and keeps you happy. It is really important that we find ways to be active even in these difficult times and make a difference to your well-being”, he said.   https://youtu.be/ndX60oHbv2A Clive Castillo talked to our reporter Rahul