Friday, April 19News For London

Tag: news

What is the gender pay gap?

What is the gender pay gap?

economy, Gender, News
With so much conversation about the pay gap in recent years, it can be tricky to decipher the facts and figures and know what it actually means for women in 2019. What does it mean? First, it’s important to note how the pay gap is defined. ONS measures the difference in percentage between men's and women’s median hourly earnings across all jobs in the UK. It is not comparing men and women doing the same job. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) reported in 2018 that the gender pay gap fell to 8.6 per cent among full-time employees in 2018. Among all employees, the gap is higher, however, at 17.9 per cent. This is largely due to the larger proportion of women in part-time jobs, which receive lower pay (“an average hourly rate is £9.36 compared with £14.31, excluding overtime, f
Period poverty: what is it and what’s being done about it?

Period poverty: what is it and what’s being done about it?

Data Journalism, Gender, Health
On the most basic level, period poverty is something experienced by women or girls who, due to financial limitations, cannot access sanitary products for their periods. While many take for granted the ability to purchase these products, many around the world put their lives on hold during menstruation or are forced to use other, sometimes unhygienic methods. Many see this as an issue affecting impoverished nations, however, this affects women across the UK as well. According to Plan International UK, 1 in 10 girls in the UK can't afford to buy sanitary products, and over 137,700 children have missed school in the UK because of this issue. Women at risk The Office for National Statistics’ (ONS) most recent report on Persistent Poverty in the UK and EU, stated that 7.3 per c

Local Council Funding Crisis

Adults, children, Data Journalism, economy, Law, London, London Mayor, News
In a recent FOI request by investigative bureau we gain some insight into local authority funding crisis. Since the fall of funding to local councils local authorities have had to find new ways to fund their needs. Before 2016 local authorities had to use money raised from selling public assets (known as capital receipts) to contribute towards debt. They were not able to use this money towards their general budget. However, in 2016 Chancellor George Osborne amended the rules to allow for ‘flexible use of capital assets.’ As a result, local councils began to sell public places such as libraries and community centres to use the capital towards their general budget. Consequently, local residents are left without community owned spaces and local jobs. Below are some staggering insi

What the ‘anti-vaxx’ campaign is, explained

Health, International, News
Vaccination has been one of the world’s biggest achievements when it comes to health and ensuring that diseases that once wiped out millions of the population – such as smallpox and the plague – does not repeat itself in history. However, the anti-vaccination movement or ‘anti-vaxxers’ has gained momentum especially with the advancement of technology and social media. The movement began around the 1990s but after reports were discredited and research disproved any claims, it died down for a while but with the increase in the volume of social media groups promoting it, there has been a concern about the negative impact of it. When did the movement all begin? It all began when a once respectable journal called Lancet, published widely discredited research on MMR (measles, mumps and
“Little Portugal’s” views on Brexit

“Little Portugal’s” views on Brexit

Audio, brexit, Business, Culture, International, May, News, Politics, ReportingWeek2, Uncategorized
The Anglo-Portuguese relations have always been strong, from Vauxhall's tube station all the way to Stockwell, you find yourself in the heart of Portuguese restaurants, hairdressers and delicatessens - which have gathered here over the last 30 years, earning the area its nickname - 'Little Portugal'. London attracts young people of working age from abroad, particularly those countries that were affected by the Eurozone crisis. With the influx of arrivals in search of employment, or studies, it's little wonder Brexit is causing so much debate. Goncalo Correia, 23 years old, currently living in the so called "Little Portugal" - has dreamed about his time in London since he was a child and is now afraid of what might happen. Marta Ramos, a 32 year old portuguese, came to Vauxhall in 20
UK economic slows, rising question of economic health after Brexit

UK economic slows, rising question of economic health after Brexit

Business, economy
After a growth over the summer, Britain’s economy lost its speed in three months to October, latest official data shows. According to the Office for National Statistics, GDP grows by 0.4 per cent from July to October, coming down from 0.6per cent, the rate of the third quarter of the year. In October, the GDP growth is 0.1 per cent. The increases are roughly flat in the three most recent month, August, September and October. “The latest data confirm that UK GDP growth is slowing after a strong performance in the middle of the year, and the risks appear to be to the downside ” Garry Young, head of macroeconomic modelling and forecasting at NIESR recommends. In this three months, services sector, with a 0.3 per cent growth, and construction sector are the main contributors to GD
Could cutting tuition fees keep you away from university at all?

Could cutting tuition fees keep you away from university at all?

Culture, Education, London, News, Student
Cutting tuition fees might not be a good idea for poorer students, the government’s new social mobility tsar has claimed.  Martina Milburn, the latest chair of the Social Mobility Commission, told The Observer: “Cutting fees will certainly help a certain sector. Whether it helps the right young people, I’m not convinced.” “There’s also evidence that if you remove tuition fees altogether, there would be a certain number of young people from particular backgrounds who wouldn’t be able to go to university at all – but if you restore something like the education maintenance allowance or a version of it, I think you would widen participation. That’s a personal view.” Last month a government proposal suggested that students in England should be offered 2-year fast track courses to c
Big Issue vendors hope contactless payment will bring social as well as financial inclusion

Big Issue vendors hope contactless payment will bring social as well as financial inclusion

Breaking News
With the rise of electronic payments across the UK and fewer people each month carrying cash on their person, public engagement with the homeless is lowest than it has ever been. Can contactless pay bring back the recognition Big Issue vendors are rapidly losing? The Big Issue has announced it will be trialling contactless payment systems in an effort to boost the income of its homeless vendors and mitigate the effects of a public consciousness that may be shifting away from the importance of giving to the homeless. The current affairs magazine has partnered with technology company iZettle for an 8-week trial across London, Bath, Birmingham, Bristol and Nottingham. If the plans are successful, they will be rolled out across the country. Buyers of the Big Issue will no longer ...
“Disgusting” office harassment: Ted Baker allegedly breaks the fantasy for fashion industry

“Disgusting” office harassment: Ted Baker allegedly breaks the fantasy for fashion industry

Breaking News, Business, Fashion, News, Social media
Staff working for the fashion brand, Ted Baker, have called an online petition to end the alleged harassment by the chief executive, Ray Kelvin, 62.  They argue that inappropriate behaviours such as “forced hugging” have become the workplace culture and human resources office left the harassment unchallenged.  The petition has been signed by more than 2,500 people, and everyone can sign it freely even if they work for other companies. As a result of that, shares in Ted Baker hit three-year low, falling almost 15 per cent by noon today.  “The owner regularly makes sexual innuendos at staff,” the petition claimed.  In response to this, the company said that “Ray greets many people he meets with a hug” and the practice was “absolutely not insisted upon.”  Ted Baker also add
Cheerleading could be future Olympic sport

Cheerleading could be future Olympic sport

DontUse, International, News, ReportingWeek2, Sport, Student
The International Cheer Union has received provisional recognition from the International Olympic Committee. The ICU will receive $25,000 to fund training the future cheerleading cohorts.  They will have the next three year recognition period to apply for additional grants and funds.  Then they can apply for full inclusion in the official Olympic games. "Cheerleading is a sport with growing popularity.  It has strong youth focus," said IOC sports director, Kit McConnell to the BBC. Steph Malfatti, the Dragons Cheer captain at the University of Westminster in London says, "it shouldn't even be a question of whether it's a sport." Miss Malfatti who is on one of England's national cheer teams goes on to say, "More than 10 countries have national teams that compete at a level most