Sunday, November 19News For London

Tag: LSE

Historic LSE Cleaners’ Strike: Outsourced workers fight segregation

Historic LSE Cleaners’ Strike: Outsourced workers fight segregation

#breakingnews, News, Politics, Specials, Student
For the first time in LSE's 126 year history, cleaners went on a 2-day strike for equal benefits as in-house staff. The demands of the strike highlight the larger problem with outsourcing in UK universities.   Mildred Simpson, 60 years old, has spent the past 16 years trying to keep the London School of Economics spotless. One of the cleaners at the leading research institute into inequalities, she works 11 hours a day, under contract from Noonan Services (a company that outsources cleaning staff to UK universities). Yet the benefits she receives are negligible compared to LSE in-house staff- 1% pension, no sick pay for the first 3 days- and workload that has cost her a knee. So she's on strike.   https://youtu.be/De91vv-EoOk The conditions of the strike, i.e., th
Is the Brexit Vote Breaking Millennial Relationships?

Is the Brexit Vote Breaking Millennial Relationships?

EU referendum, News, Politics, ReportingWeek2, Student, Uncategorized, Video
Outside the British Supreme Court last week, the atmosphere was tense, as pro-Brexit campaigners stood metres away from an anti-Brexit protest. Suddenly, a tussle between two protesters erupted, that had to be broken up by 7 policemen. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYN1M2jUe7g Remain and Leave voters fundamentally disagree on almost all issues. A Twitter poll conducted for Westminster World, with 51 participants, showed that 86% of them have argued with someone they know about Brexit. Have you ever argued with anyone you know about #Brexit ? Poll for @WestWorldUK — Blyth Brentnall (@BlythBrentnall) December 7, 2016 “Brexit revealed a number of divides in UK society: between more and less educated people, older and younger people; and to some extent the class divide as well.

Post-budget analysis: UK’s two biggest parties at odds

Business, Politics, Video
Britain's two largest political parties are moving ever further away, when it comes to economic policy. Last week's budget, delivered by Chancellor George Osborne, reflected a continuing Conservative gameplan of public spending cuts until well into the next Parliament. However, over in the Labour Party, following the election of Jeremy Corbyn MP as leader, austerity has never been more unpalatable. George Osborne stood at the dispatch box last week, delivering a budget with forecasts provided by the independent Office for Budget Responsibility, (OBR). They augur badly for his plans for deficit reduction. In the run-up to the budget, David Blanchflower, former member of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee told Westminster World that he expected the forecasts to repre...