Tuesday, June 15News For London

Tag: Italy

After Calais: Tracing the paths of the Jungle’s refugees

After Calais: Tracing the paths of the Jungle’s refugees

International, News, Opinion, Politics, ReportingWeek2, Uncategorized
“The 'Jungle' smelled of freshly baked bread and CS gas. I could not breathe and went down. An Afghan who was running in the same direction grabbed me and supported me to the back garden where there was a bit of air”, says Chiara Lauvergnac, one of the activists in Paris from London. In the final days of the Calais Jungle demolition, over 10,000 refugees were ordered to relocate in one week by riot police squads armed with flashballs, gas grenades, rubber bullets, automatic rifles, water cannons, armoured vehicles, truncheons and gas spray bottles. “Usually the camp got gassed towards the end of the day - you could climb the hill to try escape the gas clouds and watch the sunset from there, with gas grenades falling all around,” she continued. After the destruction of the camp, she says

Italy’s President says the result of the referendum is a reflection of a “solid democracy”

Blogs, Data Journalism, DontUse, International, ReportingWeek1
The President of Italy, Sergio Mattarella, has spoken for the first time since the resignation of his Prime Minister, Matteo Renzi.   In a tweet released this morning by Quirinal Palace, Mr Mattarella’s residence, the leader of the Republic said that the large number of voters in the Referendum was a “testimony of a solid democracy from a passionate country, capable of an active participation”. He also called for “serenity and reciprocal respect” to face the new political situation and the “actual problems” in the country. His intervention is an attempt to calm the voices who are calling for populism. #Quirinale, Il Presidente della Repubblica, Sergio #Mattarella, ha rilasciato la seguente dichiarazione: pic.twitter.com/k0BeO5rR13 — Quirinale Uff Stampa (@Quirinale) 5 de diciembre
Italy struggles for same-sex marriage law

Italy struggles for same-sex marriage law

News, Politics
Two men are sitting on a bench hugging each other, in Leicester Square. In front of them, a blonde and blue-eyed child is chasing pigeons. She smiles and shouts at the animals that fly away. One of the two men says to the child: “Come on, princess, it is getting late. We have got to come home.” She holds the hands of the two men and they all go home. A scene like this is usual in London. Gay couples can go out freely, without the fear of rejection or prejudice. And they have rights. They can get married and have a family. From the UK to the USA, from France to Spain, gay marriages are now recognised as a right in the most civilised nations in the world. Though Italy, a member of the G8 and one of the most important countries in the EU, is still lagging behind. Not only are gay peop
Britons react to the death of Giulio Regeni

Britons react to the death of Giulio Regeni

International, Politics
Multiple fractures, cigarette burns and fingernails forcibly extracted. This is how the body of Giulio Regeni was found in Cairo. Meanwhile, in Britain, his friends and colleagues want to know why! Mr.Regeni had spent the last ten years of his life studying and working in Leeds, Oxford and Cambridge. He went to Egypt to conduct a field research on the labor movements and independent trade unions as part of his PhD research on international development. The 28-year-old Cambridge PhD student was reported missing on the 25th of January, 2016. His body was later found in a Cairo suburb, half naked and with torture marks. His friends and colleagues are concerned that in spite of the announced joint investigation led by the Egyptian and Italian governments, the truth might not be reve