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Tag: gender

What is the gender pay gap?

What is the gender pay gap?

economy, Gender, News
With so much conversation about the pay gap in recent years, it can be tricky to decipher the facts and figures and know what it actually means for women in 2019. What does it mean? First, it’s important to note how the pay gap is defined. ONS measures the difference in percentage between men's and women’s median hourly earnings across all jobs in the UK. It is not comparing men and women doing the same job. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) reported in 2018 that the gender pay gap fell to 8.6 per cent among full-time employees in 2018. Among all employees, the gap is higher, however, at 17.9 per cent. This is largely due to the larger proportion of women in part-time jobs, which receive lower pay (“an average hourly rate is £9.36 compared with £14.31, excluding overtime, f
The UK is still the largest country to scrutinize the explosive topic of the pay gap

The UK is still the largest country to scrutinize the explosive topic of the pay gap

Adults, Business, economy, Education, International, Law, News, Politics, trends
2019 has been the second year that all companies and charities in Britain with more than 250 employees - covering almost half the country's workforce - have had to report their gender pay gap to the Government Equalities Office (GEO). 1.How does it work? Employers must submit an assessment of the gap between what man and women earn on average amongst their personnel. The deadline for reporting these numbers each year is 31st March for public sector organisations and 5th April for businesses and charities. All companies must report the differences between salaries and bonus of employees from both genders on a mean and median hourly basis.   2.What surprises did we get? The Fawcett Society, the UK's leading charity campaigning for gender equality and women's rights, has defi...

Racial and gender bias: Is there more to driving tests than just driving?

Breaking News, International, LifeStyle, London, News, ReportingWeek1, Social media, Transport
Racial and gender prejudices take charge as UK driving test statistics reveal all. Data shows women and people of colour have a lower passing rate. According to a survey held by the Department for Transport, women had a lesser passing rate in practical tests than men. The survey also revealed that 45.4 percent candidates were aged between 16 to 20 years. Additionally, Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) revealed that black women had only a 32 percent pass rate. Motorbike and moped license reports present comparable results as women showed a 50 percent passing rate when compared to men’s passing rate which stands at a 72 percent. In response to the above statistics DVSA Chief Driving Examiner Mark Winn provided Westminster World with the following statement: “DVSA
Does gender difference matter in sport?

Does gender difference matter in sport?

Sport, Sports
A new report from Women in Sport, which has tried to make sports sectors equally accessible for women and men, reveals that many girls are not engaging enough in school sports. The Charity surveyed 25,000 girls and boys from 138 secondary schools in England and Northern Ireland and found that girls are less willing to involve in sports. Based on the research, The Guardian collected perceptions from teachers, parents and pupils to change the current circumstance. This is not the first time we talk about the situation of women's sports and about fighting sexism in sports. From the popularity of tournament, athletes' income to participation, many data revealed a barrier of women in sports and a gulf between each gender's attitude towards sports. Although BBC sports study found that 83 ...
Charity fears homeless women suffer from NHS cuts

Charity fears homeless women suffer from NHS cuts

Gender, Housing, NHS, Politics
Hospitals, surgeries and shelters are not providing sanitary products for homeless people, despite the huge mobilisation for low income women’s right in the last few years. Women’s services manager for the charity Spires, Pamela Mhlophe, is concerned about the current situation: “In this moment, with NHS cutting down on many services, I don’t think they will tackle this problem too,“ she said to Westminster World. ”Private citizens and companies are helping through donations, but it should be a public issue.” Homeless women are used to living a dangerous life, full of risks, but it becomes much more difficult when they have their period. Besides finding food, a job and a place to stay, they have to look for a private toilet to wash themselves and, most importantly, find access to s
Zumba: the workout that can help you defy stereotypes

Zumba: the workout that can help you defy stereotypes

Fitness, Gender, Health, Sport
Alice* is a senior lecturer in a very traditional career. She has been in the academia for ten years now, but since 2015 she is also performing as Zumba instructor. According to several researches and the campaign #ThisGirlCan, Zumba is an excellent exercise for people’s body and mind. Still, Alice does not want to disclose her hobby as she fears being taken less seriously in her work environment. It's Tuesday evening and Alice arrives in London wearing a formal office outfit. She just got off from the train that brings her to the city after a long commute. Alice has to change clothes quickly, she has a Zumba class to teach in half an hour. “It’s always nice to come when you have a Zumba class in the evening”. Alice did her PhD in London, got a full time job and then a position as
Apps provide solution to gender gap in the workplace

Apps provide solution to gender gap in the workplace

Business, ReportingWeek1, Tech
We’ve all heard about the gender divide in the workplace, ‘the glass ceiling’ and the fact there are not enough women in the boardroom. But it’s time to move the conversation forward and provide solutions in a digital sphere where both men and women can participate. There are countless self-help articles and books on how to ‘disconnect from the internet’, cope with email anxiety and successfully create an online presence. Clearly there is a disjointment here, where the question is to consume, or to be eventually consumed by the digital sphere. “Data shows that digital not only changed how we shop, how we commercially engage with each other, how we interact, it’s fundamentally changing the world that we work in,” says Kathleen Mitchell, Vice President of fashion retail brand, Stel
The world of female firefighters: Burning gender bias

The world of female firefighters: Burning gender bias

News, Specials
How easy is it to be a female firefighter in the UK, or how difficult? Reporter Indraja Gugle explores the world of female firefighters on International Women’s Day     Sub-editor: Hussein Abdel Fattah   The sight of a smoked up kitchen or sparks around an electric gadget is enough to send us to panic-ville. But there are women out there fighting raging fires several feet high. It is not a task for the faint-hearted. Traditionally a male-dominated field, the UK is seeing a rise in the number of female firefighters. At 1.7% in 2002, the number has reached to 4.3% in 2012. However, in addition to risking their lives regularly, women in this field face various challenges, simply because they are women. Lucy Masoud, who holds a degree in politics and has done her Masters