Wednesday, April 25News For London

Tag: gender equality

Period leave: what is it and do we need it in the UK?

Period leave: what is it and do we need it in the UK?

Audio, Business, Gender
Periods, it seems natural for every woman, but based on the data, more than 1in 5 of women suffered from dysmenorrhea and rang from 37 to 91 percent of women may face heavy periods.    The painful periods can be as bad as heart attack according to the professor of family planning and productive health department at University College London, Dr. John Guillebaud.     Audio Credit: Spencer Zhang   What is Period Leave Policy ? To address this particular women issue, many Asian countries including Japan, South Korea, Indonesian and some areas in China applied period leave policy. The regulation allows women have the option to take time off during periods.  Coexist, the UK social enterprise company in Bristol has been the pioneer who intro
‘It’s crap’: Londoners speak up as pay gap widens for young women

‘It’s crap’: Londoners speak up as pay gap widens for young women

Gender, London, News
London now has the worst gender pay gap in the UK, with the disparity widening for young women, according to analysis from the Office for National Statistics. The capital had the narrowest gap in 1997 as women with full-time jobs earned 15.1 per cent less than men, but the needle barely moved two decades on as the gap is still at 14.6 percent in 2017. The trend for young women is particularly worrisome as it significantly rose from 1.1 per cent in 2011 to 5.5 per cent a mere six years later. Sam Smethers, chief executive of gender equality and women’s rights charity Fawcett Society, said: “The pay gap is widest for older women as it grows over our working lives but we are now seeing a widening of the pay gap for younger women too, which suggests we are going backwards and that is extre
Gender imparity: Fewer women are seen in broadcasting jobs

Gender imparity: Fewer women are seen in broadcasting jobs

Blogs, Data Journalism, Media, Video
Despite the fact we all can quickly recall a scene of Louise Minchin reporting while sitting on the BBC Breakfast sofa, women are insufficiently present on TV. Gender imparity is widely seen in the broadcast media industry, as one out of every four experts shown on British programmes is female, reported a research group from the school of Broadcasting at City University London. The UK does not lack outstanding women, but not enough females were being invited into the studio to make their voice known to the public. Broadcasting serves as an important public channel and greatly affects the conception of the society. A lack of women representation on TV resulted in fewer public female role models and also a lower recognition of women’s achievements across the country. Imbalanced ge