Monday, November 20News For London

Tag: Art

John Akomfrah’s Purple: Using Film to Explore Humanity and Our Impact of the Environment

John Akomfrah’s Purple: Using Film to Explore Humanity and Our Impact of the Environment

Art, Breaking News, Culture
With Rubber tires piled in a corner and plastic water jugs hanging from the ceiling, The Curve at Barbican has been transformed into a conservationist’s nightmare. Pictures on the wall show people standing in the countryside with remanence of human intrusion. At the back of the exhibit is the main event; six screens that interweave the story of human existence and its relationship with the environment.   John Akomfrah’s 'Purple' blends archival footage with his own material to create a montage of ideas and perspectives on the issue of climate change. The film is displayed over six screens and combines powerful visual and audio to shock the senses of the viewer. With so many different stimuli, the viewer must have a fine-tuned ability for finding the key aspects with the work.
London’s independent cinemas: building revolution

London’s independent cinemas: building revolution

Art, Audio, Culture, Film, Media, News, Social media
It’s Saturday evening in Central London. It’s cold outside, and a young student couple fancies a good movie. Their decision will reveal how the cinema business in the capital has evolved to a new paradigm of both management and consumption. It’s mid-March and all the Oscar-award winning films are on screen. She wants to see La la land, but he has already seen it, so it’s going to be Moonlight. They check the screenings on their smartphones. The closest venue is the Curzon in Bloomsbury. 13 pounds. Too much for their short budget. Another option: the Vue in Islington. 11 pounds. Still too expensive. They live in East London, so what about the Hackney Picturehouse? 11,5 pounds, no way. He is about to quit. Wait, she says, let’s check the Genesis in Whitechapel. Look, 7 pounds. Deal. Once
“Women have to work harder and longer to get recognised”: Are the arts a man’s world?

“Women have to work harder and longer to get recognised”: Are the arts a man’s world?

Art, Culture, Film, Media, Music, musicians, Opinion
Last night’s 89th Academy Awards made headlines for several reasons. Issues ranged from the use of the wrong photo during the memorial video and the already infamous mix-up when announcing Best Picture clouded proceedings. However one key source of controversy has followed the awards since nominees were announced: 80 per cent of nominees outside of the acting categories are male. Criticised last year for a lack of racial diversity, #OscarsSoWhite dominated coverage of the proceedings. It seems that although this year’s ceremony is more representative in some ways, the nominations still come up short in others. This has prompted us to question how much gender inequality women face within the arts. Male-dominated industries Fresh from being awarded a Breakthrough Brit award by BAFTA,
Performing for the Camera: is this art or pure self-indulgence?

Performing for the Camera: is this art or pure self-indulgence?

Culture, Galleries, Look
The first ever Instagram series presenting as art has made its debut at London’s Tate Modern. In a refined, slightly austere bathroom with plain-whitewashed walls, cream tiles and a glass of half-filled with water beside the sink, a young woman reminiscent of Botticelli’s Venus, with alabaster skin and painted red lips gazes reflectively at her self-image. Her posterior juts out provocatively, challenging the viewer while she considers her facial image, seemingly unaware of her powerful sensuality. Amalia Ulman, 27 is an Instagram artist. Using the language of the Internet in her Excellence & Perfections #itsjustdifferent, she enacts a tale of a blonde moving to Los Angeles. Playing on ideas of narcissism within social media, Ulman complicates our understanding of what is re
Tattoo in London: From the Elite to the common English man

Tattoo in London: From the Elite to the common English man

Culture, Galleries, Look, Video
Tattoos can be done anytime, if your budget allows. However, over 100 years ago, prices were not the only concern, you also had to be royalty or the son of a Prime Minister. Out of the Exit 4 at Piccadilly Circus, on the left side, there is Jermyn Street - a quiet lane with shops on both sides. This is where the first tattooist - Sutherland Macdonald - started the business in the English capital. Fast forward 100 years later, tattoo studios are spread across every high street, particularly Camden High Street and Soho. It is easy to spot people that have been inked on their arms when they roll up shirt sleeves after work. Nearly one in five Londoners have at least one tattoo and the proportion between males and females who get inked is not such a big difference, according to a surve