Thursday, September 21News For London

Tech

Is the human touch needed to put an end to online dating fails?

Is the human touch needed to put an end to online dating fails?

dating, Social media, Tech
Finding a life partner has long been a subject of concern especially after hitting your late 20’s. If you were of South Asian origin, grandmothers played cupid and had a major role in hand picking your future partner. Matchmaking in today’s world isn' just limited to the Asian household, it has come to be a well-known phenomenon globally. In London, particularly, matchmaking has turned into this million-dollar industry where professionals in their 30’s spend thousands of pounds in a quest to find the perfect match. 68% of people in the UK admit to have used online dating sites, but what is the probability that a computer algorithm will be successful in finding you the right match? Data found in 2014, shows the success rate of the different dating sites. With an overload of dating we
What will Brexit mean for UK tech startups?

What will Brexit mean for UK tech startups?

#breakingnews, Audio, brexit, EU investment, EU referendum, EU talents, International, Media, News, Politics, Social media, Tech, Tech startups, Video
UK’s tech entrepreneurs remain concerned over Brexit despite the government’s recent investment guaranteed on the Spring Budget. Talent access Jack*, a london-based tech entrepreneur, said that he is to launch a startup company, but is concerned over Brexit. He told Westminster World that he fears the hiring cost of his business would spiral because of a “hard Brexit deal”. The 29-year-old will create a digital publishing platform where consumers could be engaged by various visual content. He said: “Especially for digital startups, their employees have never had to think about residential opportunities here, whether they need visa or not. Even if Brexit is not here yet, for many of them it would make no sense to take jobs in the UK if after a year they will have to apply for certain
The unfiltered world of ‘fake’ Instagram accounts

The unfiltered world of ‘fake’ Instagram accounts

Opinion, Social media, Tech
“The selection process is mostly your close friends or anyone who you trust to see not-so-nice photos of yourself.” Emily* is an 18-year-old girl who loves Facebook and Instagram. She’s been on social media for most of her teen years, and enjoys scrolling Instagram for funny videos and photos her friends post.  Emily is acting as my guide to one trend on the photo-sharing app which is previously unchartered territory for me: Finstagrams. ‘Finstagram’ explained A ‘Finstagram’, or fake Instagram for the uninitiated, is a private Instagram account run alongside with the user’s public account. The difference between the two is that the ‘Finsta’ is a much more liberated space where posting is more frequent and less filtered. Emily explains: “a few of my friends do to kind of spam wi
Apps provide solution to gender gap in the workplace

Apps provide solution to gender gap in the workplace

Business, ReportingWeek1, Tech
We’ve all heard about the gender divide in the workplace, ‘the glass ceiling’ and the fact there are not enough women in the boardroom. But it’s time to move the conversation forward and provide solutions in a digital sphere where both men and women can participate. There are countless self-help articles and books on how to ‘disconnect from the internet’, cope with email anxiety and successfully create an online presence. Clearly there is a disjointment here, where the question is to consume, or to be eventually consumed by the digital sphere. “Data shows that digital not only changed how we shop, how we commercially engage with each other, how we interact, it’s fundamentally changing the world that we work in,” says Kathleen Mitchell, Vice President of fashion retail brand, Stel
Robots in London: is your job ‘safe’?

Robots in London: is your job ‘safe’?

Tech
Do Londoners have a competitive advantage in the event of a robot-invasion of the labour market? One in 20 jobs in London will be taken over by robotic and autonomous systems in the next 20 years. Most likely to be affected are the Square Mile's financial, insurance, business and information services. Just as Londoners traversing the underground are greeted by a sombre barrage of electronic ticket barriers instead of smiles from human ticket checkers, so robots will continue to overtake human capabilities in the capital. Nearly 15,000 more jobs in London are likely to be automated by 2035, according to researchers at Oxford University and leading recruitment agency, Adzuna. However, it's not just working-class jobs the robots are coming for, it's London's lawyers, ins

Female teachers in London are being encouraged to return to work after pregnancy to reduce teachers’ shortage crisis

News, Tech
As the UK is facing an acute teachers shortage, the government is taking a new initiative to tackle this issue by launching a job website for female teachers, to help them find work post pregnancy. “It’s common for female teachers to quit school after giving birth,” says Seema Sriram, 41, a teacher at Heston Primary School in Hounslow. She is one among the few women who returned to teaching after giving birth to twins. The government will soon start a job sharing website that is meant to encourage female teachers to return to work after their pregnancy. The aim of this website is to solve England’s teaching shortage crisis and simultaneously ensure that female teachers resume their work, after becoming new mothers. Nicky Morgan, Secretary of State for Education, also plans to launc

Artificial intelligence wins again in latest Google Go challenge

#breakingnews, News, Tech
Google’s Artificial Intelligence program AlphaGo has defeated the world champion Lee Sedol at board game Go in the first of five games. The victory in Seoul marks another breakthrough for artificial intelligence following the software’s previous five-nil win over European champion Fan Hui. Mastering the ancient Chinese board game has long been considered a grand challenge for artificial intelligence programs owing to its vast complexity and reliance on player intuition and creativity. Similar programming efforts have struggled to compete at the level of human amateurs despite many years of difficult work. AlphaGo’s victories have beaten expert predictions of accomplishing the feat by at least a decade. Founder and CEO of Google’s DeepMind division, Demis Hassabis, is responsi

Twitter users pay tribute to the email inventor who has died aged 74

Tech
Ray Tomlinson, the inventor of email, has died aged 74. His death has brought a widespread reaction across Twitter. Ray Tomlinson died on Saturday morning, his spokesman Mike Doble told the media, but Doble did not know about it until Sunday and still did not have a confirmed cause of death. “A true technology pioneer, Ray was the man who brought us email in the early days of networked computers,” Doble said in his statement quoted by The Guardian. In 1971, Tomlinson invented a programme for ARPANET, the predecessor of the Internet that allowed users to send messages to other computers. Before that, mail could be sent only to people who shared the same computer. It was the first email system in the world. This internet pioneer was also the first to put now iconic “@” sign in the ad

Uber and out: the battle for London’s streets

Business, Tech, Transport
The cacophonous din of some 8000 black taxis blasting their horns in sporadic unison tore through the afternoon of Wednesday the 10th of February. The usually bustling thoroughfare of Whitehall had been brought for a second time to a complete and surreal halt. For as far as could be seen in either direction, from Trafalgar Square to the Houses of Parliament, stretched row upon row of London’s iconic cabs. Centred outside of the guarded gates of Downing Street, the United Cabbies Group (UCG) and Rail, Maritime and Transport workers (RMT) protest had begun and the discontent was palpable. Since its 2012 London launch ‘ride’-hailing app Uber has angered the capital’s black cab industry by challenging, what has become to many, an outdated regulatory system. The company occupies a new s
Virtual reality eases depression, finds UCL

Virtual reality eases depression, finds UCL

#breakingnews, Health, Tech
Immersive virtual reality headsets could help people with depression to become more compassionate towards themselves, new research has found. Scientists from University College London and ICREA-University in Barcelona tested the therapy on 15 patients with depression. Following the virtual reality therapy, four experienced a clinically significant drop in depressive severity a month after the therapy began. A further five reported a reduction in symptoms. The 15 patients with depression used a headset to virtually interact with a crying child. The more compassion the patient shows to the child, the quicker they stop crying. This trains the patient to express empathy and compassion. In the press release, study lead Professor Chris Brewin explained. “By comforting the child and th