Tuesday, December 11News For London

Opinion

A Realist’s Guide to Renting in London

A Realist’s Guide to Renting in London

Breaking News, Harrow, Housing, London, London Mayor, News, Opinion, ReportingWeek1, ReportingWeek2, Student
Recent data from OnTheMarket.com revealed that Londoners spend up to 61% of their income on rent, with Camden being the most expensive borough. This follows a study by the trade union GMB which found that between 2011 and 2017, rent prices for two-bedroom flats in London increased by 25.9% to an average of £1,500 per month while wages only increased by 9.1%. Today, in a letter seen by The Guardian, Sadiq Khan said that he is considering the introduction of rent controls in London: “The housing crisis is now having such an effect on a generation of Londoners in favour of rent stabilisation and control are becoming overwhelming.” Khan’s proposed changes focus on “no-fault evictions”, where landlords are able to evict tenants at the end of their initial fixed term which campaigning gro
Sluggish job market: Where do media graduates stand?

Sluggish job market: Where do media graduates stand?

Breaking News, economy, International, London, Media, News, Opinion, ReportingWeek1, Social media, Student, Technology, trends
Education has become of utmost importance globally and continues to grow. This is evident in the UK as the number of recent graduates have increased from 22% in 2002 to 40% in 2017. However, the number of entry level jobs is not rising at the same pace. As of March 2018, information and communication jobs are less than half in comparison to wholesale and retail trade jobs. Considering London’s significance as a media hub, it is startling that half of its population is comprised of graduates yet it has the highest unemployment rate in the UK. Abby and Holly, employees of a talent agency in advertising, shed some light on the matter. We asked them if they would prefer much younger and fresher faces in media instead of the older, accomplished presenters, Holly said: “I would pro
Minimalistic Christmas: Value over Materialism

Minimalistic Christmas: Value over Materialism

Audio, Environment, Experience, LifeStyle, London, Opinion
With Christmas around the corner, there are a lot bargains to be taken advantage of. It all started in the beginning of the season, which escalated with Black Friday and now everyone is impatiently waiting for the Boxing Day sales.  From food to home decor, from electronics to beauty products, everything costs less and people are rushing to the stores, frantically to fill their carts with the discounted stock. Photo credits: Lia Chabane It is evident that one's bank account will be left empty, and materialistic gifts like these cannot satisfy anyone. Christmas is exactly two weeks from now and this is the time to reconsider do we really need all of these purchases. Can we enjoy the winter holidays without getting bankrupted? Is it necessary to bear the weight of Christmas shopping
Why Working Abroad is the Best Thing for Your Career

Why Working Abroad is the Best Thing for Your Career

Experience, International, Media, Opinion
The idea of working in a foreign country for any length of time is naturally daunting. Whether it's culture shock and all that comes with it, or simply the fear of leaving behind the basic comforts of "home", picking up work in a foreign destination is something many people would not consider. As scary as it may seem, it is actually one of the greatest things you could do for your career. Adding a working abroad experience to your resume or CV shows that you are not afraid of challenges that may come from putting yourself in potentially unfamiliar situations, and that you are willing to learn in any environment you find yourself in. It teaches you a confidence that is hard to come by when working in the familiar territory of your native country. It proves your dedication to your work, a...

Lost music and film history- Where has the memorabilia gone?

Art, Audio, Blogs, Culture, LifeStyle, Media, Opinion, trends, TV, What's Hot
  Silently sitting in Mariah Carey’s penthouse, Marilyn Monroe’s white piano is locked away from the world. Sold at a private Christie’s auction in 1999, it is unclear if the public will ever be able to view it again. Is the sale of personal memorabilia threatening the loss of parts of music and film history? However, It’s positive news for auction houses. The popularity of film and music memorabilia have steadily increased over the last decade. Christina Moriame from Ewbank Auction house believes its due to “more activities and awareness of sales in this specialism, marketing and being able to be pushed by valuers” another significant point is that “items are becoming older thus more collectible” she added. Auction houses are now cashing in, generating profits boasting far h
The unfiltered world of ‘fake’ Instagram accounts

The unfiltered world of ‘fake’ Instagram accounts

Opinion, Social media, Tech
“The selection process is mostly your close friends or anyone who you trust to see not-so-nice photos of yourself.” Emily* is an 18-year-old girl who loves Facebook and Instagram. She’s been on social media for most of her teen years, and enjoys scrolling Instagram for funny videos and photos her friends post.  Emily is acting as my guide to one trend on the photo-sharing app which is previously unchartered territory for me: Finstagrams. ‘Finstagram’ explained A ‘Finstagram’, or fake Instagram for the uninitiated, is a private Instagram account run alongside with the user’s public account. The difference between the two is that the ‘Finsta’ is a much more liberated space where posting is more frequent and less filtered. Emily explains: “a few of my friends do to kind of spam wi
“Women have to work harder and longer to get recognised”: Are the arts a man’s world?

“Women have to work harder and longer to get recognised”: Are the arts a man’s world?

Art, Culture, Film, Media, Music, musicians, Opinion
Last night’s 89th Academy Awards made headlines for several reasons. Issues ranged from the use of the wrong photo during the memorial video and the already infamous mix-up when announcing Best Picture clouded proceedings. However one key source of controversy has followed the awards since nominees were announced: 80 per cent of nominees outside of the acting categories are male. Criticised last year for a lack of racial diversity, #OscarsSoWhite dominated coverage of the proceedings. It seems that although this year’s ceremony is more representative in some ways, the nominations still come up short in others. This has prompted us to question how much gender inequality women face within the arts. Male-dominated industries Fresh from being awarded a Breakthrough Brit award by BAFTA,
Do we still need International Women’s Day?

Do we still need International Women’s Day?

Culture, International, Opinion
Women have come a long way since the Suffragette Movement in the early 1900s. Is a day dedicated to female empowerment still necessary in the 21st century? Next week marks the 108th International Women’s Day, where women and men around the world will celebrate female empowerment. This year, along with International Women’s Day events such as all-female business panels, talks, and even a London based Women’s run, a Women’s Day Off strike is planned. Yet, some critics claim that a day honouring women has become obsolete. Have women’s rights come far enough to erase the need for marches and events? A history The first International Women’s Day took place at the turn of the century, during a time when females had fewer employment options and were denied the right to vote. Disenfranchised
After Calais: Tracing the paths of the Jungle’s refugees

After Calais: Tracing the paths of the Jungle’s refugees

International, News, Opinion, Politics, ReportingWeek2, Uncategorized
“The 'Jungle' smelled of freshly baked bread and CS gas. I could not breathe and went down. An Afghan who was running in the same direction grabbed me and supported me to the back garden where there was a bit of air”, says Chiara Lauvergnac, one of the activists in Paris from London. In the final days of the Calais Jungle demolition, over 10,000 refugees were ordered to relocate in one week by riot police squads armed with flashballs, gas grenades, rubber bullets, automatic rifles, water cannons, armoured vehicles, truncheons and gas spray bottles. “Usually the camp got gassed towards the end of the day - you could climb the hill to try escape the gas clouds and watch the sunset from there, with gas grenades falling all around,” she continued. After the destruction of the camp, she says
Snooper’s Charter: Death Knell for UK Journalists?

Snooper’s Charter: Death Knell for UK Journalists?

Data Journalism, Media, News, Opinion, Politics, ReportingWeek1, Uncategorized
The Draft Communications Data Bill, or Snooper’s Charter as it is most commonly referred to, was passed into a law last month, despite calls for it to be repealed from various groups. Proposed by Theresa May in 2012, in the wake of whistleblower Edward Snowden’s revelations, it legitimises the same mass surveillance which Snowden’s leak had shown the UK government was guilty of. In particular, the surveillance had targeted journalists from major media organisations, placing investigative journalists on a “threat” list. The new Bill, by allowing government organisations to snoop on all internet history, cuts off the freedom of journalists to research certain topics freely, especially those not aligned with the government agenda. Snowden’s leaked documents had exposed how under PRISM, the