Monday, December 17News For London

News

The world of female firefighters: Burning gender bias

The world of female firefighters: Burning gender bias

News, Specials
How easy is it to be a female firefighter in the UK, or how difficult? Reporter Indraja Gugle explores the world of female firefighters on International Women’s Day     Sub-editor: Hussein Abdel Fattah   The sight of a smoked up kitchen or sparks around an electric gadget is enough to send us to panic-ville. But there are women out there fighting raging fires several feet high. It is not a task for the faint-hearted. Traditionally a male-dominated field, the UK is seeing a rise in the number of female firefighters. At 1.7% in 2002, the number has reached to 4.3% in 2012. However, in addition to risking their lives regularly, women in this field face various challenges, simply because they are women. Lucy Masoud, who holds a degree in politics and has done her Masters
London’s safety compromised, warns Fire Brigades Union

London’s safety compromised, warns Fire Brigades Union

Audio, News, Politics
A dispute with the government has led to Fire Services striking all over the country. In London, where more strike action could take place, Mayor Boris Johnson has threatened to withhold pay for any firefighter involved. The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) is unperturbed and insists the Conservatives must concede before Londoner’s lives are put at risk by further action. Reporter: Sonal Gupta Sub editor: Kait Borsay February saw the FBU fight back against what it interprets as a government U-turn over changes to their pension scheme and retirement age. The union accuses Fire Minister Penny Mordaunt of misleading Parliament in December 2014, when she pushed through plans to raise the retirement age of firefighters in England from 55 to 60 years old and to increase their pension contributio

Tech City celebrates the progress of women on International Women’s Day

Culture, News, Tech, Video
The achievements of women in technology and the arts have been highlighted as part of an event celebrating International Women's Day.  By Deeksha Sharma Sub Editor Sohini Sinha Tech City celebrated women-hood on International Women's Day.  The event was an a platform for women in technology and arts to exhibit their innovations.Alexandra Deschamps-Sonsino,Becky Stewart and Ana Bradley started this event aside of their career in 2013. The event held at the Digital Catapult Centre, Euston Road, was organised by these three women, with 19 women exhibitors and attended by both women and men. It was organised to raise money for Solace Women's Aid, a charity that helps women affected by domestic violence. In 2013, when they started, hundreds of people signed on a wall to muster suppor
Don’t blame university for extremism say students

Don’t blame university for extremism say students

News, Student
Students have defended the reputation of Westminster University in the light of the identification of Mohammed Emwazi (AKA 'Jihadi John') as an alumni. The university remains on 'amber alert' -  a heightened awareness of security problems. Reporters: Danae Diz & Alex Leonards Sub- editor: Jipsa George At the Cavendish campus the atmosphere is no different than a normal day. Students are gathered outside on breaks while others drink coffee and eat their lunch inside. They seem oblivious to the amber alert security measures that have been put in place. Speaking to Westminster World, Nuh, a 21-year-old student who studies Computer Science, says:“ I don’t think Westminster has had any effect on his influences, or extremism.” Nuh blames the government for 'Jihadi John’s' actions: D

BMA urges politicians ‘no more games’ with the NHS

Health, News
The BMA (British Medical Association) has launched a campaign to urge the parties to stop playing politics with the NHS in the run up to the May election. Reporter: Brendan Westhoff  Sub-editor: Jaideep Vaidya As the general election draws closer, the BMA, which is the professional association for doctors in the UK, has called for an open and honest debate about the future of the NHS. “These games have been played with the National Health Service for decades. All political parties have been guilty of it,” says Dr Mark Porter, chairman of the BMA. The campaign followed a survey, which revealed that 77 per cent of participants thought that policies regarding health care are designed to win votes for the political parties and not to do what is best for the NHS. Over three qu
Sport lessons for children slump, but charities revive interest

Sport lessons for children slump, but charities revive interest

Health, News, Sport
London's Olympics Games were a great success that boosted sport activities in schools. Correct? No. A recent survey by the Youth Sports Trust shows a drastic decline in the number of minutes spent on PE lessons in schools across the UK. If a lack of funding is to blame, a lack of interest certainly isn't - as a burgeoning partnership between a sports charity and primary schools in London proves.  Reporter: Li Ying   Sub editor: Sonal Gupta  PE hours on the decline…. Is London a more sports-loving city since the 2012 Games? With such an amazing legacy from the Olympics, you'd expect a positive answer. But figures released in January by the London-based Youth Sport Trust after a nationwide school sports survey show a different picture. Despite the coalition's promise to ‘inspire

War zones are “99 per cent boredom. One per cent sheer fear,” says BBC journalist.

Media, News
Former BBC journalist Brian Rose talks about the difference between freedom of expression and violation of expression in light of recent terrorist attacks. Reporter: Sonal Gupta Sub-editor: Li Ying. The attack by two gunmen on on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo killed 12 staff members. The attack was made in retaliation for satirical images of the Prophet Mohammed. The incident provoked debate about the levels of freedom of expression.   Brian Rose says  journalism should be practised with a certain amount of responsibility and common sense. Is Journalism an exciting profession for young people? Rose warns that young people who view journalism as being 'exciting' run the risk of compromising their own safety and security. He stresses the fact that journalism is
Anti-racism group highlights rise in online Islamophobia

Anti-racism group highlights rise in online Islamophobia

International, News
An anti-racism group has called on the European Parliament to tackle anti-Muslim posts and comments on social media. The European Network Against Racism (ENAR) warned that tackling Islamophobia is as urgent as fighting anti-Semitism on the internet.  Reporter: Hussein Abdel Fattah. Sub Editor: Hayley Daen. Although the Muslim community in London condemned the Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris and the actions of Mohammed Emwazi (identified as 'Jihadi John'), increasingly Muslims are on the receiving end of online abuse. Anti-racism groups have said that Facebook and Twitter are refusing to take down hundreds of inflammatory Islamophobic postings from across their sites despite being alerted to the content. Claire Fernandez, deputy director of the (ENAR), stated in a letter to the Eu
Islamic Society postpones controversial preacher in light of “Jihadi John” identification

Islamic Society postpones controversial preacher in light of “Jihadi John” identification

Harrow, News
The Islamic Society (ISOC) at Westminster University has stated it has no connection with Mohammed Emwazi, widely known as "Jihadi John." Talk postponed by a controversial Islamic preacher. By Alex Leonards and Danae Diz The student society, which was  due to hold a talk by controversial "homophobic" speaker Shaykh Haitham al-Haddad, assured fellow students they had no connection with "Jihadi John”. The Society added that they were not connected to any extremist groups and it “should be obvious and not need stating, but given the climate, it has become necessary to clarify such things in statements such as this.” Infamous British IS member Mohammed Emwazi, also known as "Jihadi John", graduated from The University of Westminster  in 2009 with a degree in Computer Science. But ISOC has

‘Cheers for that. Now get out!’ Brixton traders told.

News
They have survived riots and drug dealing on their doorsteps, but it will be a redevelopment plan by Lambeth Council and landlord Network Rail that will seal the fate of many shop owners in Brixton. Alex Leonards visits Atlantic Road to speak to angry traders. Sub editor: Aimee Ren A & C Co. Continental Grocers has served Brixton for 25 years. In six months time the owners will have to abandon the shop that has seen them through Brixton's best and worst of times. “It’s really gutting,” says Bella, who has been at the grocers since the very beginning. “We were here when no one else would step foot in Brixton. We’ve been through it all: riots, drug dealers lined up every 10 yards,” she says. “And now that it’s all nice, it’s like ‘Oh, cheers for that. Now get out’.” These days wal