Thursday, April 25News For London

News

What is the gender pay gap?

What is the gender pay gap?

economy, Gender, News
With so much conversation about the pay gap in recent years, it can be tricky to decipher the facts and figures and know what it actually means for women in 2019. What does it mean? First, it’s important to note how the pay gap is defined. ONS measures the difference in percentage between men's and women’s median hourly earnings across all jobs in the UK. It is not comparing men and women doing the same job. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) reported in 2018 that the gender pay gap fell to 8.6 per cent among full-time employees in 2018. Among all employees, the gap is higher, however, at 17.9 per cent. This is largely due to the larger proportion of women in part-time jobs, which receive lower pay (“an average hourly rate is £9.36 compared with £14.31, excluding overtime, f

Local Council Funding Crisis

Adults, children, Data Journalism, economy, Law, London, London Mayor, News
In a recent FOI request by investigative bureau we gain some insight into local authority funding crisis. Since the fall of funding to local councils local authorities have had to find new ways to fund their needs. Before 2016 local authorities had to use money raised from selling public assets (known as capital receipts) to contribute towards debt. They were not able to use this money towards their general budget. However, in 2016 Chancellor George Osborne amended the rules to allow for ‘flexible use of capital assets.’ As a result, local councils began to sell public places such as libraries and community centres to use the capital towards their general budget. Consequently, local residents are left without community owned spaces and local jobs. Below are some staggering insi
The UK is still the largest country to scrutinize the explosive topic of the pay gap

The UK is still the largest country to scrutinize the explosive topic of the pay gap

Adults, Business, economy, Education, International, Law, News, Politics, trends
2019 has been the second year that all companies and charities in Britain with more than 250 employees - covering almost half the country's workforce - have had to report their gender pay gap to the Government Equalities Office (GEO). 1.How does it work? Employers must submit an assessment of the gap between what man and women earn on average amongst their personnel. The deadline for reporting these numbers each year is 31st March for public sector organisations and 5th April for businesses and charities. All companies must report the differences between salaries and bonus of employees from both genders on a mean and median hourly basis.   2.What surprises did we get? The Fawcett Society, the UK's leading charity campaigning for gender equality and women's rights, has defi...
13 reasons why Portugal is a better destination than the UK

13 reasons why Portugal is a better destination than the UK

Art, Blogs, Climate, Culture, economy, Entertainment, Environment, Food, Instagram, International, LifeStyle, News, Opinion, Retro, Student, Travel, trends, Uncategorized, urban, youth
Everyone seems to be travelling to Portugal these days. Indeed, this year the country reported gleefully on another record year for overseas arrivals. Just over 12.7 million foreigners visited the country in 2017 – up 12 per cent year-on-year. Here's why it is proving so popular. Portugal has been recognized by many newspapers and magazines, including The Guardian, Condé Nast Traveller, Forbes, The New York Times, El País, CNN, World Travel Awards, the Best Of Wine Tourism, Great Wine Capitals, Catavinum and many more. These awards recognize the country’s tourism excellence. 1.Lisbon’s charm Lisbon's century-old wooden trams and iron funiculars that still lurch and rumble their way through the city are unique. Wandering from Baixa district to Graça you'll see a very traditional side

What the ‘anti-vaxx’ campaign is, explained

Health, International, News
Vaccination has been one of the world’s biggest achievements when it comes to health and ensuring that diseases that once wiped out millions of the population – such as smallpox and the plague – does not repeat itself in history. However, the anti-vaccination movement or ‘anti-vaxxers’ has gained momentum especially with the advancement of technology and social media. The movement began around the 1990s but after reports were discredited and research disproved any claims, it died down for a while but with the increase in the volume of social media groups promoting it, there has been a concern about the negative impact of it. When did the movement all begin? It all began when a once respectable journal called Lancet, published widely discredited research on MMR (measles, mumps and
Why are online creators against EU’s new Article 17 (formerly 13)?

Why are online creators against EU’s new Article 17 (formerly 13)?

News, Technology
You may have come across numerous artists using online platforms to voice their concern regarding the Article 17 drafted by EU to protect copyright. The controversial laws were first approved in September 2018 by European Parliament members, with the final version receiving approval in February after three days of talks in France. It was officially passed on April 15 by the EU after 19 countries voted in its favour with only six opposing it. Three countries abstained from voting.   Article 17 explained The Article 17 was formerly Article 13 till it was renamed on April 15. It is a component of EU’s new directive on copyright. It has been devised to better protect the rights of creators. The aim of the Article 17 to encourage cooperation between the right holders and online conte

Getting mugged in London town

Adults, crime, crime, Culture, London, London Mayor, News
Getting mugged in London town Two weeks ago, I was walking to bond station after finishing a work meeting in Regent Street, I was dragging a camera and tripod holding my phone in my hand while crossing the street I decided to put my phone in my pocket simply for a minute to not slip from my hands and break when someone came up from behind and stole it in this exact moment there, most likely this person was watching me this whole time, something also the police presumed when I went to report what happened the day after. They highlighted the patterns of how pocket pickers use the same methods for phone and wallet robberies and how they wait to do it in traffic lights or right in front of tube stations. My first reaction when I felt someone’s hand in my pocket and then running away in less
The knife crime epidemic: Are we still in the long run to stop it?

The knife crime epidemic: Are we still in the long run to stop it?

crime, Data Journalism, Gender, News, NHS, urban, youth
According to the BBC reports, in 2018, the knife crime rate in England and Wales reached the highest rate since World War II. Knife crime has become more common in big cities, especially in London. !function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",function(a){if(void 0!==a.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var e in a.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.getElementById("datawrapper-chart-"+e)||document.querySelector("iframe[src*='"+e+"']");t&&(t.style.height=a.data["datawrapper-height"][e]+"px")}})}(); There were 153 malicious murders in the London area by the end of 2018. This is the highest number within a decade, according to the official figures of the Metro Police. Nevertheless, "the plague continued at the beginning of 2019", as on the 27 March, six more stabbings were r