Wednesday, January 16News For London

Health

Glasgow bin man hid his medical history before last year’s tragic accident

Health, News, ReportingWeek1
      A Glasgow bin lorry driver could have avoided the deaths of six people if he had: “told the whole truth” about his medical history. Harry Clarke, 58, lost consciousness at the wheel of his vehicle on 22 December 2014. It then careened out of control into 23 people, leaving six dead. At a fatal accident inquiry (FAI) at Glasgow Sherriff Court, Sherriff John Beckett pointed out eight ways the tragic accident could have been avoided, all of which related to his hidden medical past. Clarke was found to have suffered: “an episode of neurocardiogenic syncope”, one of the commonest causes of fainting. Syncope is just one of a long list of conditions that drivers may need to inform authorities about including diabetes, epilepsy and anorexia. Drivers are
Health advice in the event of flooding

Health advice in the event of flooding

Harrow, Health, News, ReportingWeek1, Uncategorized
Public Health England has issued advice to homes at risk of flooding. The 14 page document answers practical questions, with an emphasis on health and well-being. Many schools and hospitals are currently closed as Storm Desmond brings wind, rain and flooding to areas of northern England. How does this compare to the floods around London in recent years? At present the rainfall of 2007 caused the worst floods since UK records began. The 2009 and 2014 bursting of the Thames Valley were comparatively less severe than the Cumbrian floods of 2015. What does the government advise in the event of a flood? The infographic below summarises the advice from Public Health England offered to people believed to be at risk of flooding.   The overwhelming findings by Public Health En

Stalkers: BEWARE ! You’re being watched.

Health, ReportingWeek1
Photo credit - Flickr Image via-  https://www.flickr.com/photos/o-mer/2103696223 In an attempt to curb stalking, a new court order will be introduced by the Home Office in England and Wales.   To address the surge of ‘Stranger Stalking’, the Home Office has planned to introduce a new court order. This kind of stalking is a situation where in the victim is stalked by an acquaintance or by a person whom they have never met.   Why is it being introduced? Due to rise of social media, stalking has become much easier, as the stalker can get information about their object of obsession. There was no legal definition of stalking. After two specific criminal offences were introduced by the Crown Prosecution Service on 25th November, 2012, there was some clarity on this. 
Bitwalking: generate money by walking

Bitwalking: generate money by walking

Health, ReportingWeek1, Tech
Bitwalking dollars is set to revolutionise how you can earn money and also help the environment.  A new digital currency is being launched where anyone can earn simply by walking around.  The App is designed to count and verify your steps as you get paid for moving from place to place. The currency was launched last weekend in Malawi, Kenya, Japan and the UK.  The Go! app is free, but requires an invite from Bitwalking to download it from outside these countries. Walking is good for the environment as it means fewer vehicles and less pollution for the planet. Because Bitwalking dollars (BW$) are earned by human movement it aims to support the reduction of global carbon footprint. In the final week of COP21, world leaders from 150 countries and thousands of environmentalists meet agai
Should sex education be an election priority?

Should sex education be an election priority?

Health, Student
Britain still has the highest rate of teenage pregnancy in Western Europe, despite a 25 per cent fall in the last decade. Reporters Indraja Gugle and Sonal Gupta speak to one young adult who had an unplanned pregnancy as a teenager and asked sexual healthcare provider, Marie Stopes International, why sex and relationship education is so important. Sub editor: Kait Borsay / Deeksha Sharma Balancing their studies and extra-curricular activities, teenagers have to learn how to navigate the path between adolescence and adulthood. Amidst the competition with their peers and embarrassing parents, a baby bump is probably the last thing you’d want to add to the list. In 2007, 42,000 young girls aged 15-17 conceived. By 2012, the number went down to 27,900, according to the latest figures b

Depression: when doctors become the patient

Health, Student
Doctors rate higher levels of depression and suicide than other professions - so why do those who work with mental illness on a daily basis find it so hard to recognise the symptoms in themselves? Reporter: Brendan Westhoff Sub editors: Ed Lauder, Kait Borsay Stress levels and the mental health of doctors over the past few decades, has increased, according to recent studies. A 2013 study in Australia, by mental health programme, Beyond Blue, surveyed more than 14,000 doctors and medical students. It showed doctors reported higher rate of depression and suicide compared to other professions and the general population. Online medical resource, Medscape, states that doctors are twice as likely to kill themselves than the general population. Are these statistics really a surpri
Cycling activists perform a ‘die-in’ on Regent Street

Cycling activists perform a ‘die-in’ on Regent Street

Health, News, Sport
Cycling activist group Stop Killing Cyclists protested by lying on the street with their bikes, in Regents Street in remembrance of Michael Mason, 70, an experienced cyclist, who was killed last year. Words, images & video: Tanya Geddes Subeditor: Di Bai / Hussein Abdel Fattah The die-in was held in conjunction with the Cyclist’s Defence Fund, a charity, that deals with cycling issues and the law. In January 2015, 13 cyclists died according to road.cc. This has prompted Donnachadh McCarthy, co-founder of Stop Killing Cyclists to “prompt for a justice, police systems and a road investment system that is human and respects human lives. Then, we can transform London into a city we can be proud of”. Anna Tatton-Brown, daughter of killed cyclist Michael Mason, 70, says
Zumba helps raise money to spread awareness

Zumba helps raise money to spread awareness

Health, News, Student
Eating Disorders Awareness Week (EDA week) is about enlightening people about eating disorders, supporting victims and encouraging people to come forward and speak about their problems. Reporter: Sohini Sinha Sub-editor: Fabeha Syed This year the EDA Week is observed from 23rd February to 2nd March 2015. It is the week to make people aware about the gravity of mental illness and raise funds to help support those with eating disorders. Gemma Domoney, 29, is teaming up with local Zumba instructors for a three hour long Zumbathon to raise funds for Beat, a charity supporting victims of eating disorders. Beat also supports those facing difficulties with food, weight and shape. The event will take place at St Margaret’s Sports Centre in Bushey on Saturday 28th February 2015. Domoney

BMA urges politicians ‘no more games’ with the NHS

Health, News
The BMA (British Medical Association) has launched a campaign to urge the parties to stop playing politics with the NHS in the run up to the May election. Reporter: Brendan Westhoff  Sub-editor: Jaideep Vaidya As the general election draws closer, the BMA, which is the professional association for doctors in the UK, has called for an open and honest debate about the future of the NHS. “These games have been played with the National Health Service for decades. All political parties have been guilty of it,” says Dr Mark Porter, chairman of the BMA. The campaign followed a survey, which revealed that 77 per cent of participants thought that policies regarding health care are designed to win votes for the political parties and not to do what is best for the NHS. Over three qu
Sport lessons for children slump, but charities revive interest

Sport lessons for children slump, but charities revive interest

Health, News, Sport
London's Olympics Games were a great success that boosted sport activities in schools. Correct? No. A recent survey by the Youth Sports Trust shows a drastic decline in the number of minutes spent on PE lessons in schools across the UK. If a lack of funding is to blame, a lack of interest certainly isn't - as a burgeoning partnership between a sports charity and primary schools in London proves.  Reporter: Li Ying   Sub editor: Sonal Gupta  PE hours on the decline…. Is London a more sports-loving city since the 2012 Games? With such an amazing legacy from the Olympics, you'd expect a positive answer. But figures released in January by the London-based Youth Sport Trust after a nationwide school sports survey show a different picture. Despite the coalition's promise to ‘inspire