Thursday, October 17News For London

Health

The NHS pairs up with dating app Tinder to increase organ donation

The NHS pairs up with dating app Tinder to increase organ donation

Health, ReportingWeek2, Social media
Dating App Tinder has teamed up with the NHS to raise awareness about organ donation. According to NHS Blood and Transplant, organ donation from people in their 20s and 30s is on the decline in the UK. Tinder has subsequently launched a campaign using celebrity profiles to encourage users to sign the organ donation register. The campaign will feature celebrities such as Jamie Laing from Made in Chelsea, Emmerdale’s Gemma Oaten and Olympic gold medallist Jade Jones. Ive teamed up with the NHS and @tinder to show the importance of organ donation! #timetosign https://t.co/eRtYPiFuGn pic.twitter.com/eG2PJjdeNf — Jamie Laing (@JamieLaing_UK) December 14, 2015 A spokesperson for he NHS told Westminster World that it is hoping the partnership with Tinder will spur an increase in you

Survey: health status of women in 20s in London

Health, News, ReportingWeek2
Many women aged 20-30 are said to have not taken good care of themselves. Photo Credit: Yiwen Li One third of females aged 16-24 and half of females aged 25-34 are overweight or obese in 2013, according to the latest annual report by the Department of Health. A high proportion of women in their 20s in England lead an unhealthy lifestyle, said Professor Dame Sally Davies, author of the report. Great alcohol consumptions, low level of physical activity and a poor diet are said in the report to be the three leading factors causing obesity or overweight. The Chief Medical Officer (CMO) said that the failure of adopting a healthy behaviour not only affects women’s health, but might also bring about further consequences, such as an increase in the risk of pregnancy complications.

Happiness is not equaling healthiness among London’s teens

Health, News, ReportingWeek1
Teenagers in London are less satisfied with life than those in the rest of the UK, according to new research. London teens had the highest rates of low life satisfaction in a national survey. Teens from the North East and West Midlands were most satisfied with their lives. The What About YOUth? Survey questioned over 120,000 teenagers across England about their health habits, and their thoughts on their health and wellbeing. The results paint a mixed picture of the health of London’s youth. Drinking rates among 15 year olds were lower than anywhere else in the country with nearly 60 percent never having had a single alcoholic drink. They were also amongst the best at eating five portions of fruit and vegetables. Over half managed to do so.   Underage Smoking Only th

Can technology improve national health?

Health, ReportingWeek1
Last autumn, the National Health Service told UK doctors that they must harness technology. So far, the government has achieved the following: GP practices are offering online booking and other digital health resources. These digital start-ups could improve further. At TechCrunch Disrupt in East London, a number of businesses showed new developments that could soon assist solving health issues in the UK. The UK has already created a database of healthcare records in April 2015. Anyone registered with NHS may track his or her medical records online. Any patient may see information about ongoing treatments and treatment received, information about allergies, any reactions to medications in the past and much more. But each doctor would have to dig into the records to extract the

Patients still want unnecessary antibiotics, even with superbugs on the rise

Health, News, ReportingWeek1
Patient satisfaction drops when GPs don’t give them the antibiotics they want, according to a new study. Despite antibiotics being ineffective for most coughs and colds, GPs are still under huge pressure from patients to prescribe them. The General Practice Patient Survey asked nearly three million adults and found that a 25% reduction in antibiotic prescription would cause a GP practise to drop by six percent in national rankings. Patient satisfaction is taken into account when determining a GPs performance-related pay. A GP practice’s rankings also affect the amount of funding they get, meaning a drop in patient satisfaction could result in a substantial budget reduction. The researchers from King’s College London were keen to point out that any drop in patient satisfacti
Are the junior doctors happy now?

Are the junior doctors happy now?

Health, News, ReportingWeek1
Junior doctors in England had planned to strike last week over disputes about pay and working hours. The strike was cancelled as the Department of Health and NHS Employers agreed to re-enter negotiations. But are the junior doctors happy with the new arrangements, and is further strike action on the cards? Why were the doctors planning a strike in the first place? Ministers have described the current contract between NHS Employers and junior doctors as being “out-dated” and “unfair.” The government drew up new contracts in 2012 detailing a new pay scale and a redefined working week. This contract was not well received by the British Medical Association (BMA) who represent junior doctors and talks subsequently broke down last year. With the breakdown in communication between

Glasgow bin man hid his medical history before last year’s tragic accident

Health, News, ReportingWeek1
      A Glasgow bin lorry driver could have avoided the deaths of six people if he had: “told the whole truth” about his medical history. Harry Clarke, 58, lost consciousness at the wheel of his vehicle on 22 December 2014. It then careened out of control into 23 people, leaving six dead. At a fatal accident inquiry (FAI) at Glasgow Sherriff Court, Sherriff John Beckett pointed out eight ways the tragic accident could have been avoided, all of which related to his hidden medical past. Clarke was found to have suffered: “an episode of neurocardiogenic syncope”, one of the commonest causes of fainting. Syncope is just one of a long list of conditions that drivers may need to inform authorities about including diabetes, epilepsy and anorexia. Drivers are
Health advice in the event of flooding

Health advice in the event of flooding

Harrow, Health, News, ReportingWeek1, Uncategorized
Public Health England has issued advice to homes at risk of flooding. The 14 page document answers practical questions, with an emphasis on health and well-being. Many schools and hospitals are currently closed as Storm Desmond brings wind, rain and flooding to areas of northern England. How does this compare to the floods around London in recent years? At present the rainfall of 2007 caused the worst floods since UK records began. The 2009 and 2014 bursting of the Thames Valley were comparatively less severe than the Cumbrian floods of 2015. What does the government advise in the event of a flood? The infographic below summarises the advice from Public Health England offered to people believed to be at risk of flooding.   The overwhelming findings by Public Health En

Stalkers: BEWARE ! You’re being watched.

Health, ReportingWeek1
Photo credit - Flickr Image via-  https://www.flickr.com/photos/o-mer/2103696223 In an attempt to curb stalking, a new court order will be introduced by the Home Office in England and Wales.   To address the surge of ‘Stranger Stalking’, the Home Office has planned to introduce a new court order. This kind of stalking is a situation where in the victim is stalked by an acquaintance or by a person whom they have never met.   Why is it being introduced? Due to rise of social media, stalking has become much easier, as the stalker can get information about their object of obsession. There was no legal definition of stalking. After two specific criminal offences were introduced by the Crown Prosecution Service on 25th November, 2012, there was some clarity on this. 
Bitwalking: generate money by walking

Bitwalking: generate money by walking

Health, ReportingWeek1, Tech
Bitwalking dollars is set to revolutionise how you can earn money and also help the environment.  A new digital currency is being launched where anyone can earn simply by walking around.  The App is designed to count and verify your steps as you get paid for moving from place to place. The currency was launched last weekend in Malawi, Kenya, Japan and the UK.  The Go! app is free, but requires an invite from Bitwalking to download it from outside these countries. Walking is good for the environment as it means fewer vehicles and less pollution for the planet. Because Bitwalking dollars (BW$) are earned by human movement it aims to support the reduction of global carbon footprint. In the final week of COP21, world leaders from 150 countries and thousands of environmentalists meet agai