Thursday, April 25News For London

Health

Explained: Drinking Latin America’s magical beverage mate

Explained: Drinking Latin America’s magical beverage mate

Food, Health
What has the power of coffee, the health benefits of tea and the appeal of chocolate? With 24 vitamins and minerals, along with 15 amino acids and antioxidants, it is difficult to find another plant anywhere in the world that can equal the nutritional value of mate. And whilst there are five other common legal stimulants in the world : coffee, tea, kola nut, cocoa, and guarana, mate comes out on top as one of the most balanced and nourishing. Also known as 'chimarrao' or 'cimarron', mate is drunk socially in Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Southern Chile and Southern Brazil. Watch my video to see how you drink this magical beverage...   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pch2MoFEadM&feature=youtu.be
Period poverty: what is it and what’s being done about it?

Period poverty: what is it and what’s being done about it?

Data Journalism, Gender, Health
On the most basic level, period poverty is something experienced by women or girls who, due to financial limitations, cannot access sanitary products for their periods. While many take for granted the ability to purchase these products, many around the world put their lives on hold during menstruation or are forced to use other, sometimes unhygienic methods. Many see this as an issue affecting impoverished nations, however, this affects women across the UK as well. According to Plan International UK, 1 in 10 girls in the UK can't afford to buy sanitary products, and over 137,700 children have missed school in the UK because of this issue. Women at risk The Office for National Statistics’ (ONS) most recent report on Persistent Poverty in the UK and EU, stated that 7.3 per c
Figures show a link between birth rates and ethnicity

Figures show a link between birth rates and ethnicity

children, Data Journalism, Education, Health, Housing, Medical, NHS, Racism
In contrast with previous studies, the recent figures show that socio-economic factors are more relevant than biological ones   Babies born from Pakistani and Black African parents had the highest infant mortality rates. Meanwhile, those from white mothers and fathers have the lowest in England and Wales, according to 2013 figures provided by the Office of National Statistics (ONS). The white community (British and Irish) suffered only 2.6 deaths per 1,000 live births. However, the figure is quite different for other minorities. Pakistani babies had a mortality rate of 6.7, Black Caribbean of 6.6, and Black African of 6.3. These ethnic groups showed the most worrying probabilities of babies’ survival. The figures displayed a scary face of how inequality works even in t

Panic attack: a practical guide for getting through and understand it

Breaking News, Experience, Health, Medical, NHS, Science, Uncategorized
A recent psychiatric investigation made by Giovanni Mansueto and Fiammetta Consci revealed interesting information about panic disorder. But what is it? Is the same as a panic attack? Carol, 25 from London, told Westminster World about her experiences, but she preferred to not show her face. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfV5FZ0HmIE&t=2s  
OVER 6,000 PEOPLE SUFFER FROM DIABETES IN ENGLAND AND “IT WILL BE EVEN WORSE”

OVER 6,000 PEOPLE SUFFER FROM DIABETES IN ENGLAND AND “IT WILL BE EVEN WORSE”

Breaking News, brexit, children, Data Journalism, Food, Health, Obesity, Uncategorized
There are almost 4 million people who have been diagnosed with diabetes in the United Kingdom, according to the last figures released by NHS Digital and Diabetes UK. Even though medical techniques are improving, the number of diabetes cases is strongly increasing. Diabetes UK predicted in its reports that if nothing changes, more than five million people will have diabetes by 2025. The last statistics include men and women who are over 17 years old and have type 1 or 2 diabetes. England is the area with the biggest percentage of people suffering from this disease among the UK, in this country the number has increased by almost one million in just 7 years. Even though type 2 diabetes is the most frequent in adults, a great percentage of children seem to suffer from type 1 diab...

What the ‘anti-vaxx’ campaign is, explained

Health, International, News
Vaccination has been one of the world’s biggest achievements when it comes to health and ensuring that diseases that once wiped out millions of the population – such as smallpox and the plague – does not repeat itself in history. However, the anti-vaccination movement or ‘anti-vaxxers’ has gained momentum especially with the advancement of technology and social media. The movement began around the 1990s but after reports were discredited and research disproved any claims, it died down for a while but with the increase in the volume of social media groups promoting it, there has been a concern about the negative impact of it. When did the movement all begin? It all began when a once respectable journal called Lancet, published widely discredited research on MMR (measles, mumps and

Only one in four people with sight loss of working age have a job, research finds

Health
26 per cent visually impaired people of working age are in employment, according to the report from The Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB). In the UK, there are almost 2 million people living with sight loss. NHS has found that currently around 360,000 people are registered as blind or partially sighted. What could affect the likelihood of getting a job? According to RNIB’s report in 2017, self-reported functional vision impacts heavily on the likelihood of being in paid employment. Only around one in 10 people with poor functional vision are in paid employment, which means no light perception or not being able to see the shapes of furniture in a room. This compares to almost 40 per cent of people who could see well enough to recognise a friend across the road in paid
Homelessness: Is contactless the solution?

Homelessness: Is contactless the solution?

Breaking News, Charity, economy, Health, Housing, London, London Mayor, News, ReportingWeek1, ReportingWeek2
Despite being one of the richest countries in the world, the United Kingdom faces a growing issue with homelessness. Many charities collect money and support those without a home but unfortunately, they fail to reach everyone in need. Stephen, 55, an ex-serviceman from the armed forces, represents a soundboard for many who have lost faith in charity. He is of the opinion that charities cheat people in the name of donation. “I would love to know where the money goes. But I already know where it goes. It goes for wages and it’s all a con. That is all it is. You’ve got the Royal British Legion. Last year they raised 42 million pounds. But it never went to the ex-servicemen. 75 percent of the people that live on the street are ex-forces. We are in a society now. We’re being lied to.”
Young people with disabilities struggle to enjoy everyday activities

Young people with disabilities struggle to enjoy everyday activities

Health, News, Politics
  Young People with disabilities are struggling to enjoy simple services such as dining in a restaurant. On the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, charities and organization are trying to raise awareness of the rights of disabled around the world, yet young people with disabilities are more likely to face daily life challenges and are less likely to enjoy many essential services as simple as dining in a restaurant, shopping or traveling. Fleur Perry, 25, said: “I have been refused service in a restaurant, patronized by till staff, and asked to email ahead by a cinema, I feel there is more to be done to make sure disabled people are included by the leisure industry." She also added: “I face a lot of difficulties to access transport, flying is something I ju
Young adults at risk of binge drinking despite drop in alcohol consumption

Young adults at risk of binge drinking despite drop in alcohol consumption

Breaking News, Health, Uncategorized
The drinking habits of teenagers and young adults has been put in the spotlight again this week with the launch of a campaign against parents introducing alcohol to their children at an early age. The ‘What’s The Harm’ initiative, run by health campaigners in the north-east of England and backed by experts across the UK, urges parents to delay the moment their child first drinks alcohol because it can damage the growing brain. It aims to dispel the myth that introducing your children to alcohol, for example with a glass of wine at the dinner table, will take away the novelty and encourage moderate drinking as they get older. Guidance from the chief medical officer says that an alcohol-free childhood and youth up to the age of 18 is healthiest – and that no child should be drinkin