Friday, September 22News For London

Environment

Olympic Legacy: Gold and Dust

Olympic Legacy: Gold and Dust

#breakingnews, Culture, economy, Environment, Housing, News, Politics, Radio, Sport, Transport
From July 25 to August 12, London hosted the XXX Olympic Games. The event was introduced by local and national authorities as an unmissable opportunity to transform the city. East London was to become a symbol of the city of the future, with affordable homes, open green spaces and sustainable means of transport. The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park was designed and built in a huge junction between the London Boroughs of Hackney, Newham and Tower Hamlets. Massive public investments were promised to provide the communities with social, cultural and sporting facilities. An old, traditional and active industrial area was evicted. Following a controversial compulsory purchase, dozens of businesses were forced to leave and hundreds of neighbours were relocated. Around £10bn were spent. Fi
Thriving without money: Local London Charities tell the tale

Thriving without money: Local London Charities tell the tale

#breakingnews, Audio, Environment, Harrow, Health, Media, News, Social media, Video
With the country facing harsh financial climate, hundreds of charities in London are striving to create a better environment for local people. Despite their efforts, a new survey now shows that all of them are in danger. How do local charities function and achieve their goals in London? What are the dangers that are stopping them from thriving? Leah Robertson joined Mind in Harrow just over a year ago with a burning passion. Passion to help those in need, especially those who suffer from mental health issues. With experience in working at mental health care homes, she holds a postgraduate diploma in Mental Health Nursing from King's College London. She is currently the coordinator of the Support & Wellbeing Information Service Harrow (SWiSH), and is in charge of supporting people wit
Behind the glass: the secret world of zoo inspections

Behind the glass: the secret world of zoo inspections

Animals, Environment
Almost 500 animals died over four years at a zoo in Cumbria, and yet inspectors allowed the zoo to remain open. How do zoo inspections work, and what went wrong?   The South Lakes Safari Zoo (SLSZ) in Cumbria made headlines earlier this month after a shocking report showed that almost 500 animals died within four years. Among the 486 deaths were five young baboons and seven healthy lion cubs who were euthanised because there wasn’t enough space to house them. A jaguar had chewed off it’s own paw, a lemur was killed after entering the wolf enclosure, and a squirrel monkey was found decomposing behind a radiator. According to reports, the “overcrowding, poor hygiene, poor nutrition, and a lack of any sort of developed veterinary care” were noticed by zoo inspectors durin
Sadiq Khan wants to overcome Boris Johnson’s efforts by announcing a £770m cycling fund

Sadiq Khan wants to overcome Boris Johnson’s efforts by announcing a £770m cycling fund

Environment, News, ReportingWeek1, Transport
The Mayor of London announced a ‘record investment’ in cycling initiatives. He promised £770m to be spent over the next five years. On Monday morning, Sadiq Khan presented an ambitious plan to increase cyclist numbers. The announcement came after his administration was criticized for not being as strong in committing to new bike routes as his predecessor Boris Johnson. The fund is part of Transport for London’s draft business plan, and will involve spending £154 million a year for infrastructure and promoting cycling. This is £4 million less than the £158 million spent last year by Boris Johnson. However, Mr. Khan's cycling schemes promises double the amount of money spent by the former Mayor over his second four-year term, which was £302 million. Two new Cycle Superhighways to se
Win for Native American Tribe after US denies key permit for Dakota Access Pipeline

Win for Native American Tribe after US denies key permit for Dakota Access Pipeline

#breakingnews, Blogs, Environment, International, Media, News, Politics, ReportingWeek1, Social media, Student
To the delight of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and many environmental activists, the Army Corps of Engineers will not grant a permit for the Dakota Access Pipeline to drill under the Missouri River.  The Army has announced its plan to “explore alternate routes.”   This is a long-awaited victory for Standing Rock Sioux tribe after months of camping out and protesting against the Pipeline.   "People have said that this is a make it or a break it, and I guess we made it," Chief Arvol Looking Horse, Keeper of the White Buffalo Calf Pipe, announced to a cheering crowd of protesters. Jo-Ellen Darcy, the Army Assistant secretary for civil works, said on Sunday that, “The best way to complete the work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeli
Housing crisis: London hosts six out of ten UK areas with more property price increase

Housing crisis: London hosts six out of ten UK areas with more property price increase

#breakingnews, Environment, News, ReportingWeek1, Social media
Are you a foreign young professional looking forward to settling in one of the trendiest areas in London? If so, you'd better rush before the prices hit new records, or just quit and pick another zone. A new report by Zoopla property agency shows the impact of the housing crisis. Data reveal that over the last five years property prices in some areas of the capital have increased more than fifty per cent. In East London hotspots Dalston and Shoreditch, for instance, property prices have risen by up to 59.89% and 58.06%, respectively. As for the average growth of housing prices, Stoke Newington (North London) and Tooting (South East) head the list with £672 and £671, respectively. Other conflict zones in the capital in terms of housing prices are Stratford (East) and Stock
Islington Flooding: Dozens forced to evacuate after water main burst

Islington Flooding: Dozens forced to evacuate after water main burst

#breakingnews, Environment, ReportingWeek1, Social media
About 100 people forced to leave their homes and Upper Street area of north London borough closed. Torrents of water was seen gushing down the streets of Upper Street in Islington, causing severe flooding in North London. Dozens of people were evacuated from their homes and streets after a ruptured water main hit homes and businesses in the early hours of Monday morning. Businesses in the shopping and dining district around Camden Passage were submerged in water. Around 100 people were sent to a nearby pub the Steam Passage Tavern as their homes flooded. A temporary displacement centre has opened at the STEAM PASSAGE TAVERN 44-46 UPPER STREET N1 0PN for residents affected by the flooding pic.twitter.com/Pb3DdnSolC — Islington MPS (@MPSIslington) December 5, 2016 The wate

Volunteers plant trees as part of city hall campaign

Environment, Food, Specials, Video
London’s newest urban woodland which is being created in Southall in Ealing borough is taking shape. The charity, Trees for Cities  recently organised its second mass planting exercise which brought the total number of trees planted so far on King George’s field to 15, 000. The goal is to plant 20,000 trees along the edge of the park. According to the charity, the woodland will provide a serene atmosphere where locals can relax and also forage. “This woodland is an edible woodland so as these trees grow, local communities [and] the children obviously will be able to come here, pick fruits and nuts and berries. “It will be great for their health, education, for the community itself and wildlife. So it has multiple benefits,” said David Elliott, Chief Executive of Trees for Cit

National Theatre celebrates Disabled Access Day after Ministers confirm cuts to disability benefits

#breakingnews, Environment
The National Theatre has taken part in Disabled Access Day, a nationwide event that encourages disabled people to visit somewhere they have ever been before. This is the second year for the National Theatre. The National Theatre said of its commitment; “it is designed to make the very best theatre and share it with as many people as possible.” Disabled Access Day, originally celebrated on 27 January but pushed forward this year to 12 March following feedback that January is too cold, came about after Paul Ralph, a powerchair user and Euan’s Guide supporter went to ‘try it out day’ at his local bus company. Paul explained that before this initiative he had not used the bus network in his hometown, as he was unsure how the ramp operated. A number of fellow institutions have j
Aldi UK under pressure to restrict pesticides that are killing off bees

Aldi UK under pressure to restrict pesticides that are killing off bees

#breakingnews, Environment, Politics
European supermarket Aldi is to phase out the use of pesticide neonicotinoids attributed to killing off bees worldwide. But will Aldi UK follow suit? In recent years, European discount retailer Aldi has expanded its operation with over 600 outlets in the UK with around 20 stores in the Greater London area. Aldi Süd - its German branch - has been the first big retailer in Europe to ban eight bee-harming pesticides from domestic fruits and vegetables produced for their markets. This includes three bee-harming neonicotinoids currently subject to a partial ban across Europe. But Aldi UK is under pressure to follow suit of its German sister company. Across the internet, environmental activists and organisations that include Friends of the Earth, Greens4Animals with support from