Monday, June 17News For London

Education

Figures show a link between birth rates and ethnicity

Figures show a link between birth rates and ethnicity

children, Data Journalism, Education, Health, Housing, Medical, NHS, Racism
In contrast with previous studies, the recent figures show that socio-economic factors are more relevant than biological ones   Babies born from Pakistani and Black African parents had the highest infant mortality rates. Meanwhile, those from white mothers and fathers have the lowest in England and Wales, according to 2013 figures provided by the Office of National Statistics (ONS). The white community (British and Irish) suffered only 2.6 deaths per 1,000 live births. However, the figure is quite different for other minorities. Pakistani babies had a mortality rate of 6.7, Black Caribbean of 6.6, and Black African of 6.3. These ethnic groups showed the most worrying probabilities of babies’ survival. The figures displayed a scary face of how inequality works even in t
The UK is still the largest country to scrutinize the explosive topic of the pay gap

The UK is still the largest country to scrutinize the explosive topic of the pay gap

Adults, Business, economy, Education, International, Law, News, Politics, trends
2019 has been the second year that all companies and charities in Britain with more than 250 employees - covering almost half the country's workforce - have had to report their gender pay gap to the Government Equalities Office (GEO). 1.How does it work? Employers must submit an assessment of the gap between what man and women earn on average amongst their personnel. The deadline for reporting these numbers each year is 31st March for public sector organisations and 5th April for businesses and charities. All companies must report the differences between salaries and bonus of employees from both genders on a mean and median hourly basis.   2.What surprises did we get? The Fawcett Society, the UK's leading charity campaigning for gender equality and women's rights, has defi...
Could cutting tuition fees keep you away from university at all?

Could cutting tuition fees keep you away from university at all?

Culture, Education, London, News, Student
Cutting tuition fees might not be a good idea for poorer students, the government’s new social mobility tsar has claimed.  Martina Milburn, the latest chair of the Social Mobility Commission, told The Observer: “Cutting fees will certainly help a certain sector. Whether it helps the right young people, I’m not convinced.” “There’s also evidence that if you remove tuition fees altogether, there would be a certain number of young people from particular backgrounds who wouldn’t be able to go to university at all – but if you restore something like the education maintenance allowance or a version of it, I think you would widen participation. That’s a personal view.” Last month a government proposal suggested that students in England should be offered 2-year fast track courses to c
Need magic to escape from modern life? Adults are loving children’s books too

Need magic to escape from modern life? Adults are loving children’s books too

Adults, books, Breaking News, children, Culture, Education, LifeStyle, News
Children and young adult’s book markets are increasing, and according to a Writers and Artists article by Chris Kloet, editor at Walker Books, around 10,000 new children’s titles are published in the UK every year, and there is also a current vogue for “young adult” novels. But can this be only attributed to the children and teenagers’ reading habits? Siobhan Curham, author and writing coach, said: “Young adult books blur the line between children’s and adult books because there is a big cross-over, with many adults reading them.” What distinguishes a children's and a young adult’s book? Joshua Cartwright, who works for Wealdstone Library and also is a writer of children's books, defined it as “books with stories or information which is understandable by the age group that they a