Monday, November 20News For London

Culture

Flipping pancakes to save lives

Audio, Culture, Politics
The annual Parliamentary Pancake Race has been running for 18 years. Mutave Mutemi and Aimee Ren speak to its organiser Jonathan Smallman. Sub Editor: Deeksha Sharma Jonathan Smallman was still a young man when he suffered from severe brain damage 30 years ago. At that time he was working as an Officer Cadet at the Royal Military Academy. “It took an awful long time to get better and when it came to looking for employment again I had to try put all my experiences together," says Smallman. It has been 12 years since his recovery and he now works for the charity Rehab UK which helps with mental and physical disability, as an editor of publications. He was excited about this year’s Parliamentary Pancake Race and says these events are a great way of creating awareness. Every

Scottish women’s group comes to London

Business, Culture
A successful initiative to help women become more independent and stand on their own feet is set to come London. Reports Sonal Gupta       SRG [Self-Reliant Group] leads an initiative where number of women come together to earn a living using their basic skills like sewing, cooking, making crafts and Christmas gifts. The aim of the group is to encourage women to become independent and generate income. SRG is currently based in Scotland, but the organisation is more than willing to take this initiative international. It will train and support every organisation from any part of the world which is a development model and has demonstrated some kind of success.       Eleanor Campbell, SRG Development Worker, says: “We have organisa
“Would you like a coffee in a lavatory? Yes, please!”

“Would you like a coffee in a lavatory? Yes, please!”

Culture, Specials
A Victorian lavatory abandoned after the Second World War has been renovated into a café. It is  located  near Oxford Street amidst some frilly restaurants .  By Deeksha Sharma   Subeditor Mutave Mutemi  In a junction of fancy restaurants, on the street down by the BBC 's Broadcasting House, The Attendant cafe is located.  It is called so  because the counter of the attendant has been retained from where food is served. Having a latte in lav may sound gross, but in reality the coffee is refreshing with some freshly whipped cream, if that’s how  you like it. After the Second World War, many public toilets were left  abandoned. But with the encouragement of officials, these were sold off to businesses and were opened up as cafes and warehouses. Under an iron shed are the stairs

Churchill biopic announced on 50th death anniversary.

Culture
After sweeping the BAFTA Awards, New Zealand born playwright, novelist and filmmaker Anthony McCarten announces his next project  based on Sir Winston Churchill’s leadership during the London blitz. By Fabeha Syed & Alex Xi Zhang   This year when Britain observed Sir Winston Churchill’s 50th death anniversary, the team behind ‘Theory of Everything’ announced ‘The Darkest Hour’ – a biopic centred around the fear that gripped Churchill during the second world war. The Churchill War Rooms where the leader operated from can be visited in London. The ongoing exhibition called ‘Undercover: Life in Churchill’s Bunker” explores the story of the people and members who worked for him. On display are the personal objects, oral histories and film interviews giving the visitors an i
Instagram #HotDudesReading: Objectifying men or women’s natural instinct?

Instagram #HotDudesReading: Objectifying men or women’s natural instinct?

Culture, Media
A new Instagram account posts pictures (taken secretly) of men reading books on the NYC subway. Reporter Indraja Gugle finds out what London's men who read on the tube think about this phenomenon, and dares to click them too (un-secretly). By Indraja Gugle Sub editor: Cynthia Liza The Instagram account #HotDudesReading, started by a bunch of New Yorkers, became an instant hit this Valentines when it published its first image – an arguably attractive guy with sharp features immersed in his book while the sun bounced off his wavy blonde hair. The caption read “Spotted this scruffy prince on his morning commute. I’m sure he’s reading a collection of post-war Russian short stories, but really thinking of how he made love to his French girlfriend this morning and the gluten free toast the

Out and about in Morocco: six street food favourites

Culture, Student
Cheaper than a train ticket to Glasgow (and about half the time, too), flying to Morocco from London has a lot more going for it than value for money.  Reporter: Nader Kaddour Sub editor: Hayley Daen While couscous and clay tagines dominate popular imagery of Moroccan foods, the street vendors found in every market and medina throughout the country are serving up treats that are cheap, delicious, and in need of a little recognition. A word of advice for the traveller in Morocco: Moroccans only eat couscous on Fridays, and tagines should take a few hours to prepare. While many restaurants try to cater to tourists' expectations for these dishes, read on to find out what the locals are eating and enjoying every day, at prices unheard of in the UK. And like all street food outlets

Marrakech: Cheap and Chic

Culture, International, Student
With the bank holiday imminent, don't let it sneak up on you without planning in advance. If you're aiming for a quick, cheap getaway, look no further than Marrakech. You'll be in for a Middle Eastern treat. By Hayley Daen. Sub Editor Danae Diz   Certain cities have a particular draw to artistic, creative types looking for inspiration and a place to decompress. When the beatniks sought refuge from the constraints of Western society, they fled to Tangiers, ready to live a life of anonymous indulgence amidst the heat and spice of the city. Today, it seems that Marrakech is the place to be. With flights from London Gatwick starting at just £32 one-way on EasyJet, a quick weekend visit needn't break the bank. The city is awash in a heady mix of dust and saffron. It is a ha

The West Meets the East: London Celebrates The Chinese New Year in Style

Culture, International, News
Soho's Chinese New Year celebrations were alive and full of colour as they welcomed in 2015: 'The Year of the Sheep' Reporters: Jipsa George  @jipsarosey and Li Ying Sub-Editor: Cristiana Ferrauti Thousands of people joined the celebrations in London to welcome the start of a New Year for the Chinese community. The parade started in Trafalgar Square, where handcrafted floats led a procession to Shaftesbury Avenue, followed by dance, music and acrobatics to entertain the crowd. The event is known to be one of the biggest celebrations outside of Asia, bringing many people together despite their cultural differences. Jipsa George reports: The Year of the Sheep The Sheep - also referred to as the Ram or the Goat - is the eighth sign of the twelve year cycle of
Mod: Why Britain’s biggest youth culture will never die

Mod: Why Britain’s biggest youth culture will never die

Culture, Fashion, Music
Mod style proves it is still going strong. From its inception in the late 50s, to a reinvention by Liam Gallagher sixty years later, today The Mod Journalist met English historian, writer and Mod Richard Weight to discuss his new book.  By Cynthia Gregoire @modjournalist. Sub editor: Kait Borsay @kaitborsay British author and historian Richard Weight hosted a panel discussion at the launch of his new book Mod: From Bebop to Britpop at Pretty Green’s Carnaby Street store in central London. People all over the world recognise Brits by the Mod look, but why is it still relevant over 60 years later? Listen here as Richard talks about what Mod style means to him. The book launch and after-party at Gibson Guitar Lounge was part of Pretty Green’s March of the Mods themed col

Festival Volunteers: Unsung Heroes Bring Colour to Chinese New Year

Culture, International, News, Specials
Meet the backbones of Chinese New Year Celebrations, without whom the festival would not be possible. By Qiwei Wang, subeditor Tara Mearsheimer.   They come from all walks of life and they decide to celebrate the New Year Festival in a unique way— by becoming part of it. From providing information to the visitors, to supporting the operations at backstage, more than a hundred volunteers joined the big army of people celebrating the Chinese New Year. It’s not just their bright-colored uniforms that distinguish them from the crowds that gathered at Trafalgar Square. It’s also their passion to contribute and eagerness to help.     In order to make the festival go smoothly, these volunteers had to make a sacrifice. They arrived before anyone else at the