Sunday, January 17News For London

Charity

Have the pets adopted during UK lockdown found their forever homes?

Have the pets adopted during UK lockdown found their forever homes?

Animal Rights, Animals, Charity, Covid-19, Uncategorized
Isolation and lack of human interaction have become the norm in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This has led many people to adopt or buy pets to keep them company.  Battersea, a leading animal charity in London, warned in a recent report that one-third of new pet owners bought an animal “on impulse,” before or during lockdown.  The report also predicted that the number of abandoned dogs could increase by around 27 percent in the next five years. But figures from a recent survey by the Waltham Foundation showed that 86 percent of pet owners have bonded with their pet during lockdown with 60 percent saying that their pet helped them maintain a regular routine and 43 percent crediting their new furry friends with reducing their anxiety.  Researched and created M
Genesis: The floating church of St Columba’s community

Genesis: The floating church of St Columba’s community

Charity, Culture, London, Uncategorized
Genesis floating on the River Lee Navigation. Photo by Gilbert McCarragher. Walk down Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Here East, along the River Lee Navigation and there will be a barge named Genesis bobbing on its waters. It’s where the local community of St Columba meet and fellowship with Reverend Dave Pilkington at its helm.  “We have a gathering called The Journey,” Pilkington told Westminster World and elaborated that the meetings are on Thursday evenings. “So it’s not a traditional service. We work to the themes of the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous." “We do that for everybody so it’s not for people who necessarily have an addiction. We see it as a fantastic spiritual programme for growth," he said. The St Columba community have been meeting at the river for
Period poverty: A petition shows people’s desire to have free menstrual products

Period poverty: A petition shows people’s desire to have free menstrual products

Charity, Gender, Women
Period poverty is a human rights issue that cannot be ignored. In the UK, there is an ongoing petition, with a lot of people wanting the government to provide free period products across the UK. photo by Jing Yang According to the research by the grassroots group Women for Independence (WFI), nearly one in five women had experienced period poverty, which has a significant impact on their hygiene, health and wellbeing. Period poverty is when those on low incomes can't afford, or access, suitable period products. Women are estimated to spend an average of £13 a month on period products and several thousand pounds over a lifetime. Mina Heaney, 28, who costs £6 a month for tampons and pads, said : “I might be able to afford it, but plenty of other women in the country
Free School Meals: Necessity amidst Coronavirus?

Free School Meals: Necessity amidst Coronavirus?

Breaking News, Celebrity, Charity, children, Education, Food, Politics, UK news, UK Political parties, Worldnews
Marcus Rashford has persuaded the government to invest a large amount of money into the Free School Meals (FSM) scheme. Photo credited by Halima Ahcene Djaballah UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson called Manchester United footballer Marcus Rashford to donate more than £400m for low-income families from early Christmas. So what is the FSM scheme exactly? FSM is a deal for children to receive free school meal vouchers for out of term time. This is thought to help financially deprived households through these challenging times. As well as free meals, the vouchers also consist of health start, education and holiday clubs. How will this affect hard-hit families due to Coronavirus? Omar Farooq (29), a teacher of a school in North West London, told Westminster World how he fe
The World’s Big Sleep Out: People hope that the fund raised by the event can really benefit the homeless

The World’s Big Sleep Out: People hope that the fund raised by the event can really benefit the homeless

Charity, News, ReportingWeek2
In London’s windy and freezing winter night in December, it is hard to imagine sleeping outside, as many homelessness people did. People from more than 50 countries slept outside in Trafalgar Square on Saturday night as part of “The World’s Big Sleep Out” to raise funds and awareness for homelessness. "It seems absolutely bloody crackers right now - the rain is so heavy - but we're doing it because basically the world has a homelessness problem, it has a displaced people problem, it has refugees." Dame Louise Casey, a former head of the government rough sleepers' unit and trustee of the Big Sleep Out, who told the BBC she hoped the event would be "symbolic". WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING: Hundreds braved cold winds and heavy rain in Trafalgar Square as part of "The World's Big Sleep
All I want for Christmas is companionship

All I want for Christmas is companionship

Charity, Christmas, Health, London, Student
Christmas has most of us rushing to book tickets, buy gifts and decorate the tree with friends and family. However, this is not the case for the over 200, 000 elderly people in the UK who are going to spend the holidays alone. For the millions of elderly living without company, Christmas is a season of loneliness.  The holidays can be especially challenging due to the added pressures of social celebrations which they are used to spending time with their loved ones. In fact, an estimated 200, 000 people will not hear from any friends or family throughout the month of December.  Loneliness can be life-altering for the elderly who are experiencing it but is also a minefield for those of us who want to help, but don’t know where to start. Studies from AgeUK show that older people are
Homelessness: Is contactless the solution?

Homelessness: Is contactless the solution?

Breaking News, Charity, economy, Health, Housing, London, London Mayor, News, ReportingWeek1, ReportingWeek2
Despite being one of the richest countries in the world, the United Kingdom faces a growing issue with homelessness. Many charities collect money and support those without a home but unfortunately, they fail to reach everyone in need. Stephen, 55, an ex-serviceman from the armed forces, represents a soundboard for many who have lost faith in charity. He is of the opinion that charities cheat people in the name of donation. “I would love to know where the money goes. But I already know where it goes. It goes for wages and it’s all a con. That is all it is. You’ve got the Royal British Legion. Last year they raised 42 million pounds. But it never went to the ex-servicemen. 75 percent of the people that live on the street are ex-forces. We are in a society now. We’re being lied to.”