Sunday, September 24News For London

Author: Mohammed Helmy

The curious case of EU students in the UK universities after Brexit

The curious case of EU students in the UK universities after Brexit

brexit, EU referendum, International, Politics, Student
Numbers of EU students applying for the UK universities have decreased by 7% to reach 42,070 students for 2017 cycle. The Universities and Colleges Admission Service (UCAS) announced last February. (Photo by: John Walker-Flickr) EU students have a significant contribution to UK economy. They generate £3.7bn for the UK economy and support over 34,000 jobs in all corners of the country, according to analysis last year from the board of Universities UK, which is a pool for 24 vice-chancellors of universities in the UK. Numbers of EU students in UK over the past five years (Photo by: UCAS) Amid fears of higher tuition fees and raising cost of living, the UK might not be the best destination for EU students. Tal Rimon, 31 years old, a German journalist who seeks to pursue her Master
What will Brexit mean for UK tech startups?

What will Brexit mean for UK tech startups?

#breakingnews, Audio, brexit, EU investment, EU referendum, EU talents, International, Media, News, Politics, Social media, Tech, Tech startups, Video
UK’s tech entrepreneurs remain concerned over Brexit despite the government’s recent investment guaranteed on the Spring Budget. Talent access Jack*, a london-based tech entrepreneur, said that he is to launch a startup company, but is concerned over Brexit. He told Westminster World that he fears the hiring cost of his business would spiral because of a “hard Brexit deal”. The 29-year-old will create a digital publishing platform where consumers could be engaged by various visual content. He said: “Especially for digital startups, their employees have never had to think about residential opportunities here, whether they need visa or not. Even if Brexit is not here yet, for many of them it would make no sense to take jobs in the UK if after a year they will have to apply for certain
The unfiltered world of ‘fake’ Instagram accounts

The unfiltered world of ‘fake’ Instagram accounts

Opinion, Social media, Tech
“The selection process is mostly your close friends or anyone who you trust to see not-so-nice photos of yourself.” Emily* is an 18-year-old girl who loves Facebook and Instagram. She’s been on social media for most of her teen years, and enjoys scrolling Instagram for funny videos and photos her friends post.  Emily is acting as my guide to one trend on the photo-sharing app which is previously unchartered territory for me: Finstagrams. ‘Finstagram’ explained A ‘Finstagram’, or fake Instagram for the uninitiated, is a private Instagram account run alongside with the user’s public account. The difference between the two is that the ‘Finsta’ is a much more liberated space where posting is more frequent and less filtered. Emily explains: “a few of my friends do to kind of spam wi
Thriving without money: Local London Charities tell the tale

Thriving without money: Local London Charities tell the tale

#breakingnews, Audio, Environment, Harrow, Health, Media, News, Social media, Video
With the country facing harsh financial climate, hundreds of charities in London are striving to create a better environment for local people. Despite their efforts, a new survey now shows that all of them are in danger. How do local charities function and achieve their goals in London? What are the dangers that are stopping them from thriving? Leah Robertson joined Mind in Harrow just over a year ago with a burning passion. Passion to help those in need, especially those who suffer from mental health issues. With experience in working at mental health care homes, she holds a postgraduate diploma in Mental Health Nursing from King's College London. She is currently the coordinator of the Support & Wellbeing Information Service Harrow (SWiSH), and is in charge of supporting people wit
Playing to learn: Minecraft Education and the thriving ed-tech market in the UK

Playing to learn: Minecraft Education and the thriving ed-tech market in the UK

Art, Culture, ed-tech, educational video games
Video games have been blamed for the decline of children’s studious pursuits since the birth of ‘Pong’ – one of the first arcade video games to reach mainstream popularity. More than a decade later, video games are being used as an educational tool for young adolescents in schools across the world.   According to a recent report on SBS World News Australia, Merryland’s East 5th graders, a school in south-west Sydney, recently used Microsofts Minecraft: Education Edition, to create a Minecraft cinematic about the traditional stories of indigenous cultures. Minecraft, for the uninitiated is a game that allows users to design and construct a virtual world, by using static objects like blocks and pillars. Geography and history seems to be the most obvious subject areas, which the g
Tattoo or not to tattoo: Are we witnessing the death of the body art?

Tattoo or not to tattoo: Are we witnessing the death of the body art?

Art, Audio, Tattoo, Video
An estimated 1 in 5 British people have at least one tattoo. There are over 2200 tattoo parlours within the UK - compare that with 1800 McDonald's or 898 Starbucks and it’s clear that Brits have a love affair with tattoos. Tattoos are more popular than ever before with 33% of millennials sporting at least one piece of ink. But what happens when the tattoo you once loved falls out of favour? When the job you desperately want doesn’t approve of the Chinese writing on your neck? Or when you break up with that partner whose name decorates your chest encased in a red heart? Tattoo’s are not as permanent as people once thought. Tattoo removal is now almost as financially lucrative as tattoos. But are we really falling out of love with our body art? The Price of Tattoos Mathew
Behind the glass: the secret world of zoo inspections

Behind the glass: the secret world of zoo inspections

Animals, Environment
Almost 500 animals died over four years at a zoo in Cumbria, and yet inspectors allowed the zoo to remain open. How do zoo inspections work, and what went wrong?   The South Lakes Safari Zoo (SLSZ) in Cumbria made headlines earlier this month after a shocking report showed that almost 500 animals died within four years. Among the 486 deaths were five young baboons and seven healthy lion cubs who were euthanised because there wasn’t enough space to house them. A jaguar had chewed off it’s own paw, a lemur was killed after entering the wolf enclosure, and a squirrel monkey was found decomposing behind a radiator. According to reports, the “overcrowding, poor hygiene, poor nutrition, and a lack of any sort of developed veterinary care” were noticed by zoo inspectors durin
Rihanna’s  third Fenty Puma collection to be a part of the Paris Fashion Week 2017

Rihanna’s third Fenty Puma collection to be a part of the Paris Fashion Week 2017

#breakingnews, Fashion, News
It is the innovative time of the year: The Fashion Week of Europe have begun. Just as in the previous week Milan’s Fashion Week has completed the preparation and work for Fashion week of Paris have begun. One of the special parts for the viewers to watch out for would be Rihanna’s new Fenty Puma collection.   Rihanna will show her 3rd #FENTYxPUMA by Rihanna collection in Paris on March 6th. pic.twitter.com/eVpb8JPtWF — Rihanna News (@TeamOfRihanna) February 3, 2017 Following her debut last year, the popular singer Rihanna is also to be expected at this year’s Paris fashion week. Where the viewers can excitingly await her third Fenty Puma collection on the 6th of March 2017. The Paris fashion week is set to be from the 28th February till the 8th March 2017. Which will m
What’s to blame for the NHS crisis?

What’s to blame for the NHS crisis?

Health, International, Medical, News, Politics, Uncategorized
People waiting in hospital corridors for hours on end, being sent home in taxis - the NHS is in crisis, but who's to blame? There is little agreement on the cause of the NHS' decline. On the one hand, the Daily Mail promotes the idea that immigrants are to blame. But protesters against cuts to the NHS and Labour politicians such as Clive Lewis, blame the Tories’ policies of austerity. Others, such as the GMB trade union worker, Gavin Davies, agree that immigrants are not to blame, but perceive the NHS crisis as a more nuanced problem. Right-wing news outlets such as The Daily Mail tend to point the finger at immigrants. One of their headlines proclaimed, “Sickly immigrants add 1 billion to NHS bill.” The Telegraph too has joined in the blame game, with stories such as one headlined, “N
Who Wears the Skirts?

Who Wears the Skirts?

Art, Blogs, Culture, Fashion, Galleries
“I want to be a man” is her dream; Dinu’s ultimate dream ever since she can remember. Struggled through school dress codes, family’s understanding, and especially her mother’s happiness, Dinu was finally given an option to at least wear trousers instead of skirts at the age of seven. You could say she is a lucky one when compared to her friend, who was labelled a “she-male” “They basically called him she-male and you are not a woman because you have something between your legs and it didn’t matter for them the way she feels inside.” Dinu relived her childhood, telling a story of a friend who shared the same dream -- A dream to live a true self. It has been twenty-five years since Dinu's mother gave her the option of clothing, and today she is eagerly awaiting the operation of her